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Immigration, Jobs and Employment Protection: Evidence from Europe

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  • Peri, Giovanni
  • D'Amuri, Francesco

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the effect of immigrants on native jobs in fourteen Western European countries. We test whether the inflow of immigrants in the period 1996-2007 decreased employment rates and/or if it altered the occupational distribution of natives with similar education and age. We find no evidence of the first but significant evidence of the second: immigrants took “simple†(manual-routine) type of occupations and natives moved, in response, toward more “complex†(abstract-communication) jobs. The results are robust to the use of an IV strategy based on past settlement of different nationalities of immigrants across European countries. We also document the labor market flows through which such a positive reallocation took place: immigration stimulated job creation, and the complexity of jobs offered to new native hires was higher relative to the complexity of destructed native jobs. Finally, we find evidence that the occupation reallocation of natives was significantly larger in countries with more flexible labor laws. This tendency was particularly strong for less educated workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Peri, Giovanni & D'Amuri, Francesco, 2010. "Immigration, Jobs and Employment Protection: Evidence from Europe," Institute of European Studies, Working Paper Series qt9rp2j8m1, Institute of European Studies, UC Berkeley.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:bineur:qt9rp2j8m1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Patricia Cortés & José Tessada, 2011. "Low-Skilled Immigration and the Labor Supply of Highly Skilled Women," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 88-123, July.
    2. Libertad González & Francesc Ortega, 2008. "How Do Very Open Economies Absorb Large Immigration Flows? Recent Evidence from Spanish Regions," Economic Reports 06-08, FEDEA.
    3. Frédéric Docquier & Çaǧlar Özden & Giovanni Peri, 2010. "The Wage Effects of Immigration and Emigration," NBER Working Papers 16646, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Joseph G. Altonji & David Card, 1991. "The Effects of Immigration on the Labor Market Outcomes of Less-skilled Natives," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration, Trade, and the Labor Market, pages 201-234 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Ian P. Preston, 2013. "The Effect of Immigration along the Distribution of Wages," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(1), pages 145-173.
    6. Giovanni Peri & Chad Sparber, 2016. "Task Specialization, Immigration, and Wages," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Economics of International Migration, chapter 3, pages 81-115 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    7. Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz & Tommaso Frattini, 2008. "The labour market impact of immigration," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(3), pages 478-495, Autumn.
    8. George J. Borjas & Lawrence F. Katz, 2007. "The Evolution of the Mexican-Born Workforce in the United States," NBER Chapters,in: Mexican Immigration to the United States, pages 13-56 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. David H. Autor & Frank Levy & Richard J. Murnane, 2003. "The Skill Content of Recent Technological Change: An Empirical Exploration," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1279-1333.
    10. David Card, 2009. "Immigration and Inequality," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0907, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    11. Simonetta Longhi & Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, 2005. "A Meta-Analytic Assessment of the Effect of Immigration on Wages," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 451-477, July.
    12. Acemoglu, Daron & Autor, David, 2011. "Skills, Tasks and Technologies: Implications for Employment and Earnings," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    13. repec:pri:cepsud:135blinder is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Ortega, Francesc & Peri, Giovanni, 2011. "The Aggregate Effects of Trade and Migration: Evidence from OECD Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 5604, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374.
    16. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 9755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. de la Rica, Sara & Glitz, Albrecht & Ortega, Francesc, 2013. "Immigration in Europe: Trends, Policies and Empirical Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 7778, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Claudia Cigagna & Giovanni Sulis, 2015. "On the potential interaction between labour market institutions and immigration policies," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(4), pages 441-468, July.
    3. De Arcangelis, Giuseppe & Di Porto, Edoardo & Santoni, Gianluca, 2015. "Migration, labor tasks and production structure," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 156-169.
    4. Bryan Caplan, 2012. "Why Should We Restrict Immigration?," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 32(1), pages 5-24, Winter.
    5. Frattini, T. (Tommaso), 2012. "GINI DP 44: Immigration and Inequality in Europe," GINI Discussion Papers 44, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    6. Uri Dadush & Mona Niebuhr, 2016. "The Economic Impact of Forced Migration," Research papers & Policy papers 1605, OCP Policy Center.
    7. Ortega, Francesc & Polavieja, Javier G., 2012. "Labor-market exposure as a determinant of attitudes toward immigration," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 298-311.
    8. Stephan Brunow & Bastian Stockinger, 2013. "Establishments' and Regions' Cultural Diversity as a Source of Innovation: Evidence from Germany," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2013022, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
    9. repec:eee:respol:v:46:y:2017:i:6:p:1175-1185 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Amelie F. Constant, 2014. "Do migrants take the jobs of native workers?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-10, May.
    11. Labanca, Claudio, 2016. "The Effects of a Temporary Migration Shock: Evidence from the Arab Spring Migration through Italy," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt1fz17847, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    12. Dustmann, Christian & Frattini, Tommaso, 2011. "Immigration: The European Experience," IZA Discussion Papers 6261, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Isabell Koske & Jean-Marc Fournier & Isabelle Wanner, 2012. "Less Income Inequality and More Growth – Are They Compatible? Part 2. The Distribution of Labour Income," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 925, OECD Publishing.
    14. Labanca, Claudio, 2014. "The effects of a temporary migration shock. The case of the Arab Spring migration toward Italy," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt8m49f3qb, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    15. repec:wsi:jicepx:v:04:y:2013:i:01:n:s179399331350004x is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Arts and Humanities; Social and Behavioral Sciences; Immigration; Task specialization; European Labor Markets;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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