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Immigration and Careers of European Workers: Effects and the Role of Policies

Author

Listed:
  • Cristina Cattaneo

    (FEEM, Italy)

  • Carlo V. Fiorio

    (University of Milano, Italy)

  • Giovanni Peri

    (UC, Davis. USA)

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the response of career, employment and wage of native Europeans to immigration. We then ask how individual country’s policies affect these responses. We use data on 11 EU countries, over the period 1995-2001. We also use the 1991 distribution of immigrants by nationality across European labor markets to construct a version of the enclave-based instrument to proxy for the flow of immigrants, that is exogenous to local demand shocks. We find that native Europeans are more likely to upgrade to more skilled and better paid occupations, when a larger number of immigrants enter their labor market. We find no evidence of an increased likelihood of non-employment or geographical mobility. We find that more flexible labor markets in a country are a key factor to have employment upgrading in response to immigration.

Suggested Citation

  • Cristina Cattaneo & Carlo V. Fiorio & Giovanni Peri, 2014. "Immigration and Careers of European Workers: Effects and the Role of Policies," Working Papers 2014.56, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2014.56
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Kemeny & Abigail Cooke, 2018. "Spillovers from immigrant diversity in cities," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(1), pages 213-245.
    2. Ted Mouw, 2016. "The Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market Outcomes of Native Workers: Evidence using Longitudinal Data from the LEHD," Working Papers 16-56, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    3. Ikhenaode, Bright Isaac, 2018. "Immigration, Skill Acquisition and Fiscal Redistribution in a Search-Equilibrium Model," MPRA Paper 89897, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Costa Daniela & Rodriguez Maria Jose, 2020. "North-North Migration and Agglomeration in the European Union 15," Working Papers 2020-07, Banco de México.
    5. Anthony Edo, 2017. "The Impact of Immigration on Wage Dynamics: Evidence from the Algerian Independence War," CESifo Working Paper Series 6595, CESifo.
    6. Amaral, Ernesto F. L. & Rios-Neto, Eduardo L G & Potter, Joseph E, 2016. "The influence of internal migration on male earnings in Brazil, 1970–2000," OSF Preprints y8v2d, Center for Open Science.
    7. Martina Bazzoli & Joan E. Madia & Federico Podestà, 2022. "Another battle of the have-nots? The Impact of Immigration on the Poverty Risk of Western European," FBK-IRVAPP Working Papers 2022-07, Research Institute for the Evaluation of Public Policies (IRVAPP), Bruno Kessler Foundation.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigrants; Europe; Occupation Upgrading; Mobility; Labor Market Policies;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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