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Immigrants' and Native Workers: New Analysis on Longitudinal Data

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  • Mette Foged
  • Giovanni Peri

Abstract

Using longitudinal data on the universe of workers in Denmark during the period 1991-2008 we track the labor market outcomes of low skilled natives in response to an exogenous inflow of low skilled immigrants. We innovate on previous identification strategies by considering immigrants distributed across municipalities by a refugee dispersal policy in place between 1986 and 1998. We find that an increase in the supply of refugee-country immigrants pushed less educated native workers (especially the young and low-tenured ones) to pursue less manual-intensive occupations. As a result immigration had positive effects on native unskilled wages, employment and occupational mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • Mette Foged & Giovanni Peri, 2013. "Immigrants' and Native Workers: New Analysis on Longitudinal Data," NBER Working Papers 19315, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19315
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    Cited by:

    1. Joan Monras, 2020. "Immigration and Wage Dynamics: Evidence from the Mexican Peso Crisis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 128(8), pages 3017-3089.
    2. Lewis, Ethan & Peri, Giovanni, 2015. "Immigration and the Economy of Cities and Regions," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: Gilles Duranton & J. V. Henderson & William C. Strange (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 0, pages 625-685, Elsevier.
    3. Dhimitri Qirjo, 2015. "Monitoring, endogenous comparative advantage, and immigration," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-22, December.
    4. Andreas Beerli & Giovanni Peri, 2015. "The Labor Market Effects of Opening the Border: Evidence from Switzerland," NBER Working Papers 21319, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Osea Giuntella, 2020. "Do immigrants improve the health of native workers?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 102-102, December.
    6. Ortega, J. & Verdugo, G., 2015. "The Impact of Immigration on the Local Labor Market Outcomes of Blue Collar Workers: Panel Data Evidence," Working Papers 15/07, Department of Economics, City University London.
    7. Parrotta, Pierpaolo & Pozzoli, Dario & Sala, Davide, 2016. "Ethnic diversity and firms' export behavior," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 248-263.
    8. Cattaneo, Cristina & Fiorio, Carlo V. & Peri, Giovanni, 2013. "What Happens to the Careers of European Workers When Immigrants "Take Their Jobs"?," IZA Discussion Papers 7282, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Edo Anthony, 2015. "The Impact of Immigration on Native Wages and Employment," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(3), pages 1151-1196, July.
    10. Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio, 2015. "Do immigrants improve the health of natives?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 140-153.
    11. Fabian Eckert & Conor Walsh & Mads Hejlesen, 2018. "The Return to Big City Experience: Evidence from Danish Refugees," 2018 Meeting Papers 1214, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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