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The Impact of Immigration on Native Wages and Employment

  • Anthony Edo

    ()

    (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - CNRS : UMR8174 - Université Paris I - Panthéon-Sorbonne, EEP-PSE - Ecole d'Économie de Paris - Paris School of Economics - Ecole d'Économie de Paris)

This paper investigates the immigration impact on native outcomes using micro-level data for France. I find that immigration does not affect the wages of competing natives, but induces adverse employment effects. This finding is consistent with a wage structure that is much less flexible in France. The quality of the data allows to dig more deeply into the interpretation of the immigration impact. First, I show that immigrants displace native workers because they are more willing to have bad employment conditions. Second, I find that natives on short-term contracts, who are less subject to wage rigidities, do experience wage losses due to immigration.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) with number halshs-00881131.

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Date of creation: Sep 2013
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Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:halshs-00881131
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00881131
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  1. Steinhardt Max Friedrich, 2011. "The Wage Impact of Immigration in Germany - New Evidence for Skill Groups and Occupations," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-35, June.
  2. Michael Gerfin & Boris Kaiser, 2010. "The Effects of Immigration on Wages: An Application of the Structural Skill-Cell Approach," Diskussionsschriften dp1012, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
  3. Bernt Bratsberg & James F. Ragan & Zafar M. Nasir, 2002. "The Effect of Naturalization on Wage Growth: A Panel Study of Young Male Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(3), pages 568-597, July.
  4. Xavier Thierry, 2004. "Évolution récente de l'immigration en France et éléments de comparaison avec le Royaume-Uni," Population (french edition), Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), vol. 59(5), pages 725-764.
  5. Amelie Constant & Annabelle Krause & Ulf Rinne & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2010. "Reservation Wages of First and Second Generation Migrants," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1089, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  6. Bauer, Thomas K. & Lofstrom, Magnus & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2000. "Immigration Policy, Assimilation of Immigrants and Natives' Sentiments towards Immigrants: Evidence from 12 OECD-Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 187, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Denis Fougere & Mirna Safi, 2009. "Naturalization and employment of immigrants in France (1968-1999)," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(1/2), pages 83-96, May.
  8. Felbermayr, Gabriel & Geis, Wido & Kohler, Wilhelm K., 2010. "Restrictive immigration policy in Germany: Pains and gains foregone?," Munich Reprints in Economics 20616, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  9. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, August.
  11. Bernt Bratsberg & Oddbjørn Raaum, 2011. "Immigration and Wages: Evidence from Construction," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2011016, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  12. Javier Ortega & Gregory Verdugo, 2011. "Immigration and the Occupational Choice of Natives: A Factor Proportions Approach," CEP Discussion Papers dp1043, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  13. Sá, Filipa, 2011. "Does employment protection help immigrants? Evidence from European labor markets," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 624-642, October.
  14. David Card & Thomas Lemieux, 2000. "Can Falling Supply Explain the Rising Return to College for Younger Men? A Cohort-Based Analysis," NBER Working Papers 7655, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Heckman, James J, 1993. "What Has Been Learned about Labor Supply in the Past Twenty Years?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 116-21, May.
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