IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/17461.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Substitution Between Immigrants, Natives, and Skill Groups

Author

Listed:
  • George J. Borjas
  • Jeffrey Grogger
  • Gordon H. Hanson

Abstract

The wage impact of immigration depends crucially on the elasticity of substitution between similarly skilled immigrants and natives and the elasticity of substitution between high school dropouts and graduates. This paper revisits the estimation of these elasticities. The U.S. data indicate that equally skilled immigrants and natives are perfect substitutes. The value of the second elasticity depends on how one controls for changes in demand that have differentially affected high school dropouts and graduates. The groups are imperfect substitutes under standard trend assumptions, but even slight deviations from these assumptions can lead to an outright rejection of the CES framework.

Suggested Citation

  • George J. Borjas & Jeffrey Grogger & Gordon H. Hanson, 2011. "Substitution Between Immigrants, Natives, and Skill Groups," NBER Working Papers 17461, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17461
    Note: ITI LS
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w17461.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:pal:easeco:v:43:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1057_s41302-016-0011-z is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Carmen Camacho & Fabio Mariani & Luca Pensieroso, 2017. "Illegal immigration and the shadow economy," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 24(6), pages 1050-1080, December.
    3. Ramstetter, Eric D., 2016. "Foreign Workers, Foreign Multinationals, and Wages by Occupation and Sex in Malaysia’s Manufacturing Plants during the mid-1990s," AGI Working Paper Series 2016-23, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    4. Emily Gu & Chad Sparber, 2017. "The Native-Born Occupational Skill Response to Immigration within Education and Experience Cells," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 43(3), pages 426-450, June.
    5. Marcus H. Böhme & Sarah Kups, 2017. "The economic effects of labour immigration in developing countries: A literature review," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 335, OECD Publishing.
    6. Peter McHenry, 2015. "Immigration and the Human Capital of Natives," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(1), pages 34-71.
    7. Ramstetter, Eric D., 2017. "Foreign Workers, Foreign Multinationals, and Wages after Controlling for Occupation and Sex in Malaysia’s Manufacturing Plants during the mid-1990s," AGI Working Paper Series 2017-13, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    8. repec:bla:worlde:v:40:y:2017:i:6:p:1068-1088 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Stöhr, Tobias, 2015. "The returns to occupational foreign language use: Evidence from Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 86-98.
    10. Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio, 2014. "Do Immigrants Bring Good Health?," IZA Discussion Papers 8073, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Luca Marchiori & Patrice Pieretti & Benteng Zou, 2014. "Immigration, occupational choice and public employment," CREA Discussion Paper Series 14-15, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    12. Blau, Francine D. & Kahn, Lawrence M., 2012. "Immigration and the Distribution of Incomes," IZA Discussion Papers 6921, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Vincent Fromentin & Olivier Damette & Benteng Zou, 2017. "The Global Economic Crisis and The Effect of Immigrant Workers on Native-born Employment in Europe," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(6), pages 1068-1088, June.
    14. Edo, Anthony & Toubal, Farid, 2017. "Immigration and the gender wage gap," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 196-214.
    15. Eric D. , Ramstetter, 2016. "Experiences with Foreign Workers in Singapore and Malaysia: What are the Lessons for Japan's Labor Markets?," AGI Working Paper Series 2016-06, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    16. Boeters, Stefan & Savard, Luc, 2013. "The Labor Market in Computable General Equilibrium Models," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17461. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: () or (Joanne Lustig). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.