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The Economic Causes and Consequences of Canadian Citizenship

Author

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  • DeVoretz, Don J.

    () (Simon Fraser University)

  • Pivnenko, Sergiy

    () (Simon Fraser University)

Abstract

Immigrants ascend to citizenship at differential rates in Canada. Why is this so? This paper investigates the economic costs and benefits derived from citizenship to rationalize the differential rates of citizenship ascension. Canadian earnings evidence confirms the sizable economic benefits of citizenship. A decomposition analysis attributes this benefit to selfselection, namely only the more productive immigrants become Canadian citizens.

Suggested Citation

  • DeVoretz, Don J. & Pivnenko, Sergiy, 2004. "The Economic Causes and Consequences of Canadian Citizenship," IZA Discussion Papers 1395, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1395
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    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp1395.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bernt Bratsberg & James F. Ragan & Zafar M. Nasir, 2002. "The Effect of Naturalization on Wage Growth: A Panel Study of Young Male Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(3), pages 568-597, July.
    2. Krishna Pendakur & Ravi Pendakur, 1998. "The Colour of Money: Earnings Differentials Among Ethnic Groups in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(3), pages 518-548, August.
    3. Cotton, Jeremiah, 1988. "On the Decomposition of Wage Differentials," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(2), pages 236-243, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Vahan Sargsyan, 2017. "Treatment-Related Naturalization Premiums in Two European Countries: Evaluation and Comparison," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp585, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    2. Denis Fougère & Mirna Safi, 2009. "Naturalization and employment of immigrants in France (1968-1999)," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(1/2), pages 83-96, March.
    3. Steinhardt, Max Friedrich, 2012. "Does citizenship matter? The economic impact of naturalizations in Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 813-823.
    4. Nicola D. Coniglio & Giuseppe De Arcangelis & Laura Serlenga, 2010. "Return Decisions of Undocumented Migrants: Do Network Effects Help the High‐skilled Overstay?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(s1), pages 93-113, December.
    5. Susan Brown & Jennifer Hook & Jennifer Glick, 2008. "Generational Differences in Cohabitation and Marriage in the US," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 27(5), pages 531-550, October.
    6. Fougère, Denis & Safi, Mirna, 2008. "The Effects of Naturalization on Immigrants’ Employment Probability (France, 1968–1999)," IZA Discussion Papers 3372, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigration; citizenship; Canada;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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