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Technology Innovations, Organisational Changes and Firms’ Wages in Italy

Author

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  • Paolo Ghinetti

    () (SEMEQ Department - Faculty of Economics - University of Eastern Piedmont)

Abstract

This paper uses longitudinal data for a sample of Italian firms to study the effects of technological and organisational changes on wage levels and on wage differentials by skills inside the firm. Fixed effect estimates reveal that technological changes are associated with higher absolute and relative wages for skilled workers. About organisational changes, initially their relationship with firms’ wages is negative, but it becomes positive in subsequent periods, especially for skilled workers. Finally, there is no evidence that the wage increase is higher when technological and organisational changes are adopted in conjunction instead of separately.

Suggested Citation

  • Paolo Ghinetti, 2007. "Technology Innovations, Organisational Changes and Firms’ Wages in Italy," Working Papers 111, SEMEQ Department - Faculty of Economics - University of Eastern Piedmont.
  • Handle: RePEc:upo:upopwp:111
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    File URL: http://semeq.unipmn.it/files/Quaderno%2020.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Information technology; organisational change; wages; Italy;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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