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Wages and Workplace Computer Use in Chile


  • José Miguel Benavente

    () (Facultad de Economía y Negocios, Universidad de Chile)

  • David Bravo

    () (Facultad de Economía y Negocios, Universidad de Chile
    Facultad de Economía y Empresa, Universidad Diego Portales)


This paper presents robust evidence regarding the impact of computer use at the workplace in Chile for the period 2000-2006. The main contribution is to present evidence in a developing country using matching techniques, assuming a homogeneous treatment effect. Wage impact is then measured through the nearest neighbor and kernel estimator. Results consistently show that there is a premium associated to the use of computers at the workplace, which is interpreted as an increase in the person’s productivity derived from the inclusion of an additional production factor, i.e. the computer. All of this is consistent with a model where penetration of computers decreases this premium, something that actually has occurred in Chile during this period. In effect, the estimates show a premium about 26% for 2000 but in 2006 it goes down to 16%.

Suggested Citation

  • José Miguel Benavente & David Bravo, 2010. "Wages and Workplace Computer Use in Chile," Working Papers 4, Facultad de Economía y Empresa, Universidad Diego Portales.
  • Handle: RePEc:ptl:wpaper:4

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    Cited by:

    1. Rita K. Almeida & Ana M. Fernandes & Mariana Viollaz, 2017. "Does the Adoption of Complex Software Impact Employment Composition and the Skill Content of Occupations? Evidence from Chilean Firms," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0214, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    2. Mathias Silva, 2016. "TIC y Desigualdad Salarial en Uruguay," Documentos de Investigación Estudiantil (students working papers) 16-06, Instituto de Economía - IECON.
    3. Marandino, Joaquin & Wunnava, Phanindra V., 2014. "The Effect of Access to Information and Communication Technology on Household Labor Income: Evidence from One Laptop Per Child in Uruguay," IZA Discussion Papers 8415, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. repec:gam:jecomi:v:5:y:2017:i:3:p:35-:d:112390 is not listed on IDEAS

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