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TIC y Desigualdad Salarial en Uruguay

Author

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  • Mathias Silva

    (Universidad de la República (Uruguay). Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y de Administración.)

Abstract

This paper seeks to identify possible unequalizing effects on private-sector wage workers due to PC, Internet, and/or Cellphone use at their job and the abilities to do so. A new data source is used for this analysis, the 2013 Survey on Information and Communication Technologies Uses (EUTIC 2012 (INE)). Through the use of Quantile Regressions and Mincer wage equations the hypothesis that mere use of this technologies and heterogeneity in the specific skills to do so has no significant effect on Uruguay's wage distribution in 2013 is tested. The results found do not provide enough evidence to reject such hypothesis, nor do they suggest the existence of significant differences on the effects of different variables commonly associated to wages between those individuals that use ICT at their jobs and those who don't.

Suggested Citation

  • Mathias Silva, 2016. "TIC y Desigualdad Salarial en Uruguay," Documentos de Investigacion Estudiantil (students working papers) 16-06, Instituto de Economia - IECON.
  • Handle: RePEc:ulr:tpaper:die-06-16
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Desigualdad Salarial; TIC; Uruguay; regresiones cuantílicas;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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