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Returning to the Returns to Computer Use

Author

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  • Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia
  • Cindy Zoghi

Abstract

This paper re-examines the returns to computer use using a new matched workplace-employee data from Canada. We control for potential selection using instrumental variables. Results suggest that it is not merely the employee having a computer on his desk, but rather having complementary computer skills, that causes wages to increase.
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Suggested Citation

  • Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia & Cindy Zoghi, 2005. "Returning to the Returns to Computer Use," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 314-317, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:95:y:2005:i:2:p:314-317
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/000282805774670509
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Entorf, Horst & Gollac, Michel & Kramarz, Francis, 1999. "New Technologies, Wages, and Worker Selection," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(3), pages 464-491, July.
    2. John E. DiNardo & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 1997. "The Returns to Computer Use Revisited: Have Pencils Changed the Wage Structure Too?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 291-303.
    3. Mark Doms & Timothy Dunne & Kenneth R. Troske, 1997. "Workers, Wages, and Technology," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 253-290.
    4. David H. Autor & Lawrence F. Katz & Alan B. Krueger, 1998. "Computing Inequality: Have Computers Changed the Labor Market?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1169-1213.
    5. Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia & Cindy Zoghi, 2004. "Which Workers Gain from Computer Use?," Working Papers 373, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Dolton & Panu Pelkonen, 2007. "The Impact of Computer Use, Computer Skills and Computer Use Intensity: Evidence from WERS 2004," CEE Discussion Papers 0081, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    2. Peter Dolton & Panu Pelkonen, 2008. "The Wage Effects of Computer Use: Evidence from WERS 2004," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(4), pages 587-630, December.
    3. Mathias Silva, 2016. "TIC y Desigualdad Salarial en Uruguay," Documentos de Investigación Estudiantil (students working papers) 16-06, Instituto de Economía - IECON.
    4. Cindy Zoghi & Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia, 2007. "Which workers gain upon adopting a computer?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 40(2), pages 423-444, May.
    5. Marandino, Joaquin & Wunnava, Phanindra V., 2014. "The Effect of Access to Information and Communication Technology on Household Labor Income: Evidence from One Laptop Per Child in Uruguay," IZA Discussion Papers 8415, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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