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Do We Need Computer Skills to Use a Computer? Evidence from Britain

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  • Borghans, Lex
  • Weel, Bas ter

    (MERIT)

Abstract

Using data from the 1997 Skills Survey of the Employed BritishWorkforce, we examine the returns to computer skills in Britain.Many researchers, using information on computer use, have concludedthat wage differentials between computer users and non-users might,among others, be due to differences in the embodiment of computerskills. Using unique information on the importance, level of sophisti-cationand effectiveness of computer use, we show that computer skillsdo not yield significant labour market returns for most types of use.Examining the returns to computer skills at different levels of sophis-ticationof use, yields estimates suggesting returns to computer skillsat the highest level of sophistication of use only.

Suggested Citation

  • Borghans, Lex & Weel, Bas ter, 2002. "Do We Need Computer Skills to Use a Computer? Evidence from Britain," Research Memorandum 040, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umamer:2002040
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    Cited by:

    1. Lex Borghans & Bas ter Weel & Bruce A. Weinberg, 2008. "Interpersonal Styles and Labor Market Outcomes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(4).
    2. Noemi Oggero & Maria Cristina Rossi & Elisa Ughetto, 2020. "Entrepreneurial spirits in women and men. The role of financial literacy and digital skills," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 55(2), pages 313-327, August.
    3. Joaquin Marandino & Phanindra V. Wunnava, 2017. "The Effect of Access to Information and Communication Technology on Household Labor Income: Evidence from One Laptop Per Child in Uruguay," Economies, MDPI, vol. 5(3), pages 1-10, September.
    4. Chris N. Sakellariou & Harry A. Patrinos, 2004. "Technology, computers and wages: evidence from a developing economy," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 47(3-4), pages 543-543.
    5. Cindy Zoghi & Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia, 2007. "Which workers gain upon adopting a computer?," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 40(2), pages 423-444, May.
    6. Borghans, L. & ter Weel, B.J., 2002. "Do older workers have more trouble using a computer than younger workers?," ROA Research Memorandum 1E, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    7. Roziah Mohd Rasdi & Thomas N. Garavan & Maimunah Ismail, 2011. "Understanding Proactive Behaviours and Career Success: Evidence from an Emerging Economy," Organizations and Markets in Emerging Economies, Faculty of Economics, Vilnius University, vol. 2(2).
    8. Fabienne Kiener & Ann-Sophie Gnehm & Simon Clematide & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2019. "IT skills in vocational training curricula and labour market outcomes," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0159, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Sep 2022.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    economics of technology ;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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