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The Endogeneity Between Language and Earnings: An international analysis

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  • B.R. Chiswick
  • P.W. Miller

Abstract

This study is concerned with the determinants of dominant language fluency, its effects on earnings, and its endogeneity with earnings among immigrants. Dominant language fluency is hypothesized to be a function of three fundamental variables: exposure to the language, efficiency in second language acquisition, and economic benefits from language fluency. Conceptual variables with empirical counterparts are developed. Earnings are hypothesized to be a function of language skills, among other variables. Ordinary least squares, instrumental variables, and sample selection bias techniques are used to estimate the equations for Australia. Comparisons are made with analyses for the United States, Canada, and Israel. Copyright 1995 by University of Chicago Press.
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Suggested Citation

  • B.R. Chiswick & P.W. Miller, 1993. "The Endogeneity Between Language and Earnings: An international analysis," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 93-03, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:93-03
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McManus, Walter & Gould, William & Welch, Finis, 1983. "Earnings of Hispanic Men: The Role of English Language Proficiency," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(2), pages 101-130, April.
    2. Mark B. Stewart, 1983. "On Least Squares Estimation when the Dependent Variable is Grouped," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 50(4), pages 737-753.
    3. Manski, C.F., 1992. "Identification Problems in the Social Sciences," Working papers 9217, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    4. Dustmann, Christian, 1994. "Speaking Fluency, Writing Fluency and Earnings of Migrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 7(2), pages 133-156.
    5. Chiswick, Barry R & Miller, Paul W, 1985. "Immigrant Generation and Income in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 61(173), pages 540-553, June.
    6. Evelina Tainer, 1988. "English Language Proficiency and the Determination of Earnings among Foreign-Born Men," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(1), pages 108-122.
    7. Robinson, Chris, 1989. "The Joint Determination of Union Status and Union Wage Effects: Some Tests of Alternative Models," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(3), pages 639-667, June.
    8. Chiswick, Barry R, 1991. "Speaking, Reading, and Earnings among Low-Skilled Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(2), pages 149-170, April.
    9. Chiswick, Barry R, 1980. "The Earnings of White and Coloured Male Immigrants in Britain," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 47(185), pages 81-87, February.
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