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English Language Proficiency and the Determination of Earnings among Foreign-Born Men

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  • Evelina Tainer

Abstract

English language proficiency, a relatively new variable which has not been well specified in recent studies, is used to explain differences in earnings among foreign-born men based on the 1976 Survey of Income and Education. Taking into account the standard human capital and personal characteristics, English language proficiency is found to have significant positive influence on earnings for all ethnic groups. In particular, the earnings of foreign-born Hispanic and Asian men relative to foreign-born men of European ethnicity are most affected by English language proficiency.

Suggested Citation

  • Evelina Tainer, 1988. "English Language Proficiency and the Determination of Earnings among Foreign-Born Men," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(1), pages 108-122.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:23:y:1988:i:1:p:108-122
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    Cited by:

    1. Paul W. Miller & Barry R. Chiswick, 2002. "Immigrant earnings: Language skills, linguistic concentrations and the business cycle," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(1), pages 31-57.
    2. Stark, Oded & Jakubek, Marcin, 2013. "Integration as a catalyst for assimilation," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 62-70.
    3. Donald R. Haurin & Stuart S. Rosenthal, 2009. "Language, Agglomeration and Hispanic Homeownership," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 37(2), pages 155-183.
    4. Lang Kevin & Siniver Erez, 2009. "The Return to English in a Non-English Speaking Country: Russian Immigrants and Native Israelis in Israel," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-30, November.
    5. Parker, Susan W & Rubalcava, Luis & Teruel, Graciela, 2005. "Schooling Inequality and Language Barriers," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(1), pages 71-94, October.
    6. B.R. Chiswick & P.W. Miller, 1993. "The Endogeneity Between Language and Earnings: An international analysis," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 93-03, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    7. David E. Bloom & Gilles Grenier, 1993. "Language, Employment and Earnings in the United States: Spanish-English Differentials from 1970 to 1990," NBER Working Papers 4584, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Berman, Eli & Lang, Kevin & Siniver, Erez, 2003. "Language-skill complementarity: returns to immigrant language acquisition," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 265-290, June.
    9. Aslund, Olof & Engdahl, Mattias, 2012. "The Value of Earning for Learning: Performance Bonuses in Immigrant Language Training," IZA Discussion Papers 7118, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Sari Pekkala Kerr & William R. Kerr, 2011. "Economic Impacts of Immigration: A Survey," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 1-32, Spring.
    11. Chiswick, Barry R & Miller, Paul W, 1995. "The Endogeneity between Language and Earnings: International Analyses," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(2), pages 246-288, April.
    12. Richard Akresh & Redstone Akresh, 2011. "Using Achievement Tests to Measure Language Assimilation and Language Bias among the Children of Immigrants," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(3), pages 647-667.
    13. Dustmann, Christian & Glitz, Albrecht, 2011. "Migration and Education," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    14. Chiswick, Barry R. & Miller, Paul W., 2014. "International Migration and the Economics of Language," IZA Discussion Papers 7880, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Ilana Redstone Akresh, 2008. "Occupational Trajectories of Legal US Immigrants: Downgrading and Recovery," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 34(3), pages 435-456.
    16. Andres Sanchez Jabba, 2013. "Bilinguismo en Colombia," REVISTA ECONOMÍA & REGIÓN, UNIVERSIDAD TECNOLÓGICA DE BOLÍVAR, vol. 7(2), pages 65-89, December.
    17. Aldashev, Alisher & Gernandt, Johannes & Thomsen, Stephan L., 2009. "Language usage, participation, employment and earnings: Evidence for foreigners in West Germany with multiple sources of selection," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 330-341, June.
    18. Tam, King Wa & Page, Lionel, 2016. "Effects of language proficiency on labour, social and health outcomes of immigrants in Australia," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 66-78.
    19. Zavodny, Madeline, 2000. "The Effects of Official English Laws on Limited-English-Proficient Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(3), pages 427-452, July.
    20. Geoffrey Carliner, 1996. "The Wages and Language Skills of U.S. Immigrants," NBER Working Papers 5763, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Are Skeie Hermansen, 2017. "Age at Arrival and Life Chances Among Childhood Immigrants," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(1), pages 201-229, February.
    22. Matthew A. Painter & Zhenchao Qian, 2016. "Wealth Inequality Among Immigrants: Consistent Racial/Ethnic Inequality in the United States," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(2), pages 147-175, April.
    23. David E. Bloom & Gilles Grenier, 1991. "The Earnings of Linguistic Minorities: French in Canada and Spanish in the United States," NBER Working Papers 3660, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Barry Chiswick & Paul Miller, 2001. "A model of destination-language acquisition: Application to male immigrants in Canada," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(3), pages 391-409, August.

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