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Technology Adoption and Workforce Skill in U.S. Manufacturing Plants

Author

Listed:
  • Dunne, Timothy

    () (University of Oklahoma)

  • Troske, Kenneth

    () (University of Kentucky)

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between technology adoption and workforce skill in US manufacturing plants. Using information on the use and adoption of seven different information technologies, we find that the relationship between technology adoption and workforce skill varies across the technologies. Technologies more closely related to engineering and design tasks are associated with more skilled workforces. Technologies more closely related to production activities are not. When we examine the relationship between technology adoption and skill upgrading of workforces, we find little correlation between the use and/or adoption of technologies and changes in workforce skill at the plant level. However, we do find that plants adopting technologies related to engineering and design tasks do grow faster over the period 1987-1997.

Suggested Citation

  • Dunne, Timothy & Troske, Kenneth, 2004. "Technology Adoption and Workforce Skill in U.S. Manufacturing Plants," IZA Discussion Papers 1427, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1427
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    workforce skill; technology adoption;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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