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Skill-Biased Technological Change: Evidence from a Firm-Level Survey

Author

Listed:
  • Donald S. Siegel

    (University of Nottingham Business School)

Abstract

Siegel provides evidence that technology adoption is associated with downsizing, skill upgrading, greater employee empowerment, and a widening wage gap. Unlike previous studies that use industry-level data, Siegel collected firm-level data on technology usage and labor composition which enable him to link the magnitude of labor market outcomes for six classes of workers to the types of technologies implemented.

Suggested Citation

  • Donald S. Siegel, 1999. "Skill-Biased Technological Change: Evidence from a Firm-Level Survey," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number sbtc, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:sbtc
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. W. Craig Riddell & Xueda Song, 2017. "The Role of Education in Technology Use and Adoption: Evidence from the Canadian Workplace and Employee Survey," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 70(5), pages 1219-1253, October.
    2. Albert Link & John Scott, 2002. "Explaining Observed Licensing Agreements: Toward a Broader Understanding of Technology Flows," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 211-231.
    3. Claudio Piga & Donald S. Siegel, 2003. "New Evidence on the Link between Technological Change and Employment: Extending the Neo-Classical Paradigm," Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics 0303, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics.
    4. R. Antonietti, 2006. "The skill content of technological change. Some conjectures on the role of education and job-training in reducing the timing of new technology adoption," Working Papers 556, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    5. Indjikian, Rouben & Siegel, Donald S., 2005. "The Impact of Investment in IT on Economic Performance: Implications for Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 681-700, May.
    6. Donald S. Siegel & Kenneth L. Simons, 2006. "Assessing the Effects of Mergers and Acquisitions on Firm Performance, Plant Productivity, and Workers: New Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data," Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics 0601, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics.
    7. Handel, Michael J., 2003. "Implications of Information Technology for Employment, Skills, and Wages: A Review of Recent Research," MPRA Paper 80077, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Gordon, Lansing Alexander, 2002. "The e-skip-gen effect. The emergence of a cybercentric management model and the F2B market segment for industry," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 11-29, November.
    9. Donald S. Siegel & Kenneth L. Simons & Tomas Lindstrom, 2005. "Ownership Change, Productivity, and Human Capital: New Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data in Swedish Manufacturing," Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics 0502, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics.
    10. Oliver Falck & Stephan Heblich, 2007. "Dynamic Clusters," Working Papers 016, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    11. Vijay K. Mathur & Sheldon H. Stein, 2005. "Do amenities matter in attracting knowledge workers for regional economic development?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 84(2), pages 251-269, June.
    12. Oliver Falck & Stephan Heblich, 2007. "Modern Location Factors in Dynamic Regions," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(10), pages 1385-1403, May.
    13. Xiaohua Yang & Cheryl Rivers, 2009. "Antecedents of CSR Practices in MNCs’ Subsidiaries: A Stakeholder and Institutional Perspective," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 86(2), pages 155-169, March.
    14. Dunne, Timothy & Troske, Kenneth, 2004. "Technology Adoption and Workforce Skill in U.S. Manufacturing Plants," IZA Discussion Papers 1427, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Timothy Dunne & Kenneth Troske, 2005. "Technology Adoption And The Skill Mix Of Us Manufacturing Plants," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 52(3), pages 387-405, July.
    16. Siegel, Donald S. & Waldman, David & Link, Albert, 2003. "Assessing the impact of organizational practices on the relative productivity of university technology transfer offices: an exploratory study," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 27-48, January.
    17. John Marsh & Donald S. Siegel & Kenneth L. Simons, 2007. "Assessing the Effects of Ownership Change on Women and Minority Employees: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 161-178.
    18. Donald S. Siegel & Kenneth L. Simons & Tomas Lindstrom, 2009. "Ownership Change, Productivity, and Human Capital: New Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data," NBER Chapters,in: Producer Dynamics: New Evidence from Micro Data, pages 397-442 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Donald Siegel & David Waldman & Albert Link, 1999. "Assessing the Impact of Organizational Practices on the Productivity of University Technology Transfer Offices: An Exploratory Study," NBER Working Papers 7256, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Feng, Guangchao Charles, 2015. "Determinants of Internet diffusion: A focus on China," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 176-185.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    skill-biased; technological change; human capital; technology; skills;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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