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Returns to Computer Use: A Simple Test on the Productivity Interpretation

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  • Hessel Oosterbeek

    (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

This paper finds that returns to computer use do not vary with the intensity of computer use. This is evidence against the productivity interpretation of these returns and supports the view that returns to computer use can be attributed tounobserved heterogeneity.

Suggested Citation

  • Hessel Oosterbeek, 1997. "Returns to Computer Use: A Simple Test on the Productivity Interpretation," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 97-011/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:19970011
    as

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    File URL: https://papers.tinbergen.nl/97011.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alan B. Krueger, 1993. "How Computers Have Changed the Wage Structure: Evidence from Microdata, 1984–1989," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(1), pages 33-60.
    2. Brian D. Bell, "undated". "Skill-Biased Technical Change and Wages: Evidence from a Longitudinal Data Se," Economics Papers W25., Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    3. John E. DiNardo & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 1997. "The Returns to Computer Use Revisited: Have Pencils Changed the Wage Structure Too?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 291-303.
    4. Bound, John & Johnson, George, 1992. "Changes in the Structure of Wages in the 1980's: An Evaluation of Alternative Explanations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 371-392, June.
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    Cited by:

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    2. Silke Anger & Johannes Schwarze, 2003. "Does Future PC Use Determine Our Wages Today? — Evidence from German Panel Data," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 17(3), pages 337-360, September.
    3. Borghans, L. & ter Weel, B.J., 2000. "How Computerization changes the UK Labour Market: The Facts viewed from a new perspective," ROA Working Paper 7E, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).

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