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Computer use and wages: evidence from Taiwan

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  • Liu, Jin-Tan
  • Tsou, Meng-Wen
  • Hammitt, James K.

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  • Liu, Jin-Tan & Tsou, Meng-Wen & Hammitt, James K., 2004. "Computer use and wages: evidence from Taiwan," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 43-51, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:82:y:2004:i:1:p:43-51
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    1. James J. Heckman, 1976. "The Common Structure of Statistical Models of Truncation, Sample Selection and Limited Dependent Variables and a Simple Estimator for Such Models," NBER Chapters,in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 5, number 4, pages 475-492 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Alan B. Krueger, 1993. "How Computers Have Changed the Wage Structure: Evidence from Microdata, 1984–1989," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(1), pages 33-60.
    3. Liu, Jin-Tan & Tsou, Meng-Wen & Hammitt, James K, 2001. "The Impact of Advanced Technology Adoption on Wage Structures: Evidence from Taiwan Manufacturing Firms," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(271), pages 359-378, August.
    4. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & David N. Margolis, 1999. "High Wage Workers and High Wage Firms," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(2), pages 251-334, March.
    5. John E. DiNardo & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 1997. "The Returns to Computer Use Revisited: Have Pencils Changed the Wage Structure Too?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 291-303.
    6. Mark Doms & Timothy Dunne & Kenneth R. Troske, 1997. "Workers, Wages, and Technology," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 253-290.
    7. Haskel, Jonathan, 1999. "Small Firms, Contracting-Out, Computers and Wage Inequality: Evidence from UK Manufacturing," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 66(261), pages 1-21, February.
    8. Lucy Chennells & John Van Reenen, 1998. "Establishment Level Earnings, Technology And The Growth Of Inequality: Evidence From Britain," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2-4), pages 139-164.
    9. Entorf, Horst & Kramarz, Francis, 1997. "Does unmeasured ability explain the higher wages of new technology workers?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(8), pages 1489-1509, August.
    10. Chennells, Lucy & Van Reenen, John, 1997. "Technical Change and Earnings in British Establishments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(256), pages 587-604, November.
    11. Oosterbeek, Hessel, 1997. "Returns from computer use: A simple test on the productivity interpretation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 273-277, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chiswick, Barry R. & Miller, Paul W., 2005. "Computer Skills, Destination Language Proficiency and the Earnings of Natives and Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 1755, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Ng, Ying Chu, 2006. "Levels of computer self-efficacy, computer use and earnings in China," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 90(3), pages 427-432, March.
    3. Song, Moohoun & Orazem, Peter & Singh, Rajesh, 2006. "Broadband Access, Telecommuting and the Urban-Rural Digital Divide," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12495, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Hsin-Fan Chen & Long-Hwa Chen, 2007. "The role of computer use and English proficiency in gender wage inequality: Taiwanese evidence," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 10(16), pages 1-9.
    5. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:10:y:2007:i:16:p:1-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Yemisi Kuku & Peter F. Orazem & Rajesh Singh, 2007. "Computer adoption and returns in transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 15(1), pages 33-56, March.
    7. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2014. "Technological Change and Wages in China: Evidence from Matched Employer–Employee Data," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(1), pages 123-138, February.
    8. Zhang, Feng & Park, Timothy A., 2004. "Computer Adoption Patterns Of U.S. Small Businesses," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20250, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    9. Barry Chiswick & Paul Miller, 2007. "Computer usage, destination language proficiency and the earnings of natives and immigrants," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(2), pages 129-157, June.
    10. Giorgio Pietro, 2007. "The effect of computer use on earnings in Italy," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 245-262, September.
    11. Liu, Ting-Kun & Chen, Jong-Rong & Huang, Cliff J. & Yang, Chih-Hai, 2014. "Revisiting the productivity paradox: A semiparametric smooth coefficient approach based on evidence from Taiwan," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 300-308.

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