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Internet Use and Job Search

Author

Listed:
  • T. Randolph Beard
  • George S. Ford
  • Richard P. Saba
  • Richard A. Seals Jr.

Abstract

We combine regression and propensity score methods to estimate the effect of Internet use on job search. We exploit the distinction between the unemployed and the discouraged, where both desire employment but the latter has ceased active job search due to negative beliefs about the labor market. Results indicate broadband use at home or at public locations reduces discouragement by over 50 percent. Our findings suggest Internet use keeps the jobless active in job search and may equate to more employment. Our results also demonstrate public connections (e.g., at libraries) in unserved and underserved areas may produce substantial societal benefits.

Suggested Citation

  • T. Randolph Beard & George S. Ford & Richard P. Saba & Richard A. Seals Jr., 2010. "Internet Use and Job Search," Auburn Economics Working Paper Series auwp2010-07, Department of Economics, Auburn University.
  • Handle: RePEc:abn:wpaper:auwp2010-07
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    File URL: http://cla.auburn.edu/econwp/Archives/2010/2010-07.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard K. Crump & V. Joseph Hotz & Guido W. Imbens & Oscar A. Mitnik, 2009. "Dealing with limited overlap in estimation of average treatment effects," Biometrika, Biometrika Trust, vol. 96(1), pages 187-199.
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    9. Betsey Stevenson, 2009. "The Internet and Job Search," NBER Chapters,in: Studies of Labor Market Intermediation, pages 67-86 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    13. Cameron,A. Colin & Trivedi,Pravin K., 2008. "Microeconometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9787111235767.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Given free Internet to the unemployed
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2010-12-17 20:57:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Lembcke, Alexander, 2014. "Home computers and married women's labor supply," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60269, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. repec:hig:fsight:v:11:y:2017:i:4:p:33-43 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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