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Migration Background and Educational Tracking: Is there a Double Disadvantage for Second-Generation Immigrants?

Author

Listed:
  • Elke Lüdemann
  • Guido Schwerdt

Abstract

Research on immigrants’ educational disadvantages largely focuses on differences in student achievement tests. Exploiting data from the German PIRLS extension, we find that second-generation immigrants face additional disadvantages with respect to grades and teacher recommendations for secondary school tracks that cannot be explained by differences in student achievement tests and general intelligence. Second-generation immigrations are disproportionately affected by prevailing social inequalities at the transition to secondary school tracks due to their generally less favorable socio-economic background. We additionally provide new evidence suggesting that these inequalities might be related to the failing economic assimilation of immigrants.

Suggested Citation

  • Elke Lüdemann & Guido Schwerdt, 2010. "Migration Background and Educational Tracking: Is there a Double Disadvantage for Second-Generation Immigrants?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3256, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_3256
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp3256.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Elke Lüdemann & Guido Schwerdt, 2011. "Zuwanderer der zweiten Generation: Im deutschen Schulsystem doppelt benachteiligt?," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 64(04), pages 19-25, February.
    2. David Kiss, 2010. "Are Immigrants Graded Worse in Primary and Secondary Education? – Evidence for German Schools," Ruhr Economic Papers 0223, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    3. repec:zbw:rwirep:0223 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Annabelle Krause & Ulf Rinne & Simone Schüller, 2015. "Kick It Like Özil? Decomposing the Native-Migrant Education Gap," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 757-789, September.
    5. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Gianandrea Lanzara, 2012. "Educational achievement of second‐generation immigrants: an international comparison," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 27(69), pages 143-185, January.
    6. Ralph Hippe & Luisa De Sousa Lobo Borges de Araujo & Patricia Dinis Mota da Costa, 2016. "Equity in Education in Europe," JRC Working Papers JRC104595, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    7. David Kiss, 2013. "Are immigrants and girls graded worse? Results of a matching approach," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(5), pages 447-463, December.
    8. Elke Lüdemann, 2011. "Schooling and the Formation of Cognitive and Non-cognitive Outcomes," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 39, January.
    9. Martin Schlotter, 2011. "The Effect of Preschool Attendance on Secondary School Track Choice in Germany - Evidence from Siblings," ifo Working Paper Series 106, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    10. Oliver Himmler & Robert Schwager, 2013. "Double Standards in Educational Standards – Do Schools with a Disadvantaged Student Body Grade More Leniently?," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 14(2), pages 166-189, May.
    11. Ralph Hippe & Maciej Jakubowski, 2018. "Immigrant background and expected early school leaving in Europe: evidence from PISA," JRC Working Papers JRC109065, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigration; educational inequalities; educational tracking; Germany;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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