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The Effect of Preschool Attendance on Secondary School Track Choice in Germany - Evidence from Siblings

  • Martin Schlotter

We study the effect of preschool attendance on secondary school track choice in Germany which is a crucial outcome that largely predicts educational pathways of children. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel, multivariate models show a significant positive association between years of preschool attendance and a child’s probability of attending the highest school track, that is, German Gymnasium. Including family fixed effects in a sibling model, our estimates become considerablysmaller and are no longer significant, indicating an upward bias in multivariate models. Accounting for several sibling-specific covariates, such as measures of innate abilityand social skills, does not change this result. The low intensity of Germany’s centerbased preschool system might be a reason for the zero effects.

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File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/WP/WP-Ifo_Working_Papers/wp-ifo-2011/IfoWorkingPaper-106.pdf
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Paper provided by Ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich in its series Ifo Working Paper Series with number Ifo Working Paper No. 106.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:ces:ifowps:_106
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