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Long-Term Effects of Early Childhood Care and Education

Author

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  • Ruhm, Christopher J.

    (University of Virginia)

  • Waldfogel, Jane

    (Columbia University)

Abstract

This paper critically reviews what we know about the long-term effects of parental leave and early childhood education programs. We find only limited evidence that expansions of parental leave durations improved long-run educational or labor market outcomes of the children whose parents were affected by them, perhaps because benefits are hard to measure or confined to sub-groups, or because leave entitlements were sufficiently long, even before recent extensions, to yield most potential benefits. By contrast, expansions of early education generally yield benefits at school entry, adolescence, and for adults, particularly for disadvantaged children; however the gains may be less pronounced when high quality subsidized child care was available prior to the program expansion or when subsidies increased the use of low quality care.

Suggested Citation

  • Ruhm, Christopher J. & Waldfogel, Jane, 2011. "Long-Term Effects of Early Childhood Care and Education," IZA Discussion Papers 6149, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6149
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    Cited by:

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    2. Nina Drange & Tarjei Havnes, 2015. "Child care before age two and the development of language and numeracy. Evidence from a lottery," Discussion Papers 808, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    3. Ludovica Gambaro & Kitty Stewart & Jane Waldfogel, 2013. "A question of quality: Do children from disadvantaged backgrounds receive lower quality early years education and care in England?," CASE Papers case171, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    4. van Huizen, Thomas & Plantenga, Janneke, 2018. "Do children benefit from universal early childhood education and care? A meta-analysis of evidence from natural experiments," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 206-222.
    5. Peter, Frauke H. & Schober, Pia S. & Spiess, Katharina C., 2016. "Early Birds in Day Care: The Social Gradient in Starting Day Care and Children’s Non-cognitive Skills," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, vol. 62(4), pages 725-751.
    6. Marigen Narea, 2014. "Does early centre-based care have an impact on child cognitive and socio-emotional development? Evidence from Chile," CASE Papers case183, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    7. Almudena Moreno Mínguez, 2017. "The Role of Family Policy in Explaining the International Variation in Child Subjective Well-Being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 134(3), pages 1173-1194, December.
    8. Andritzky, Jochen & Aretz, Bodo & Christofzik, Désirée I. & Schmidt, Christoph M., 2016. "Influx of refugees: Integration as a key challenge," Working Papers 09/2016, German Council of Economic Experts / Sachverständigenrat zur Begutachtung der gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung.
    9. Gambaro, Ludovica & Stewart, Kitty & Waldfogel, Jane, 2013. "A question of quality: do children from disadvantagedbackgrounds receive lower quality early years educationand care in England?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51274, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. repec:cep:sticas:/183 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Narea, Marigen, 2014. "Does early centre-based care have an impact on child cognitive and socio-emotional development? Evidence from Chile," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 103992, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    12. Saitadze, Inga, 2021. "Mediating effects of early childhood programs and high quality home environments on the cognitive development of poor children involved in the child welfare system," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 120(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    parental leave; early childhood care and education;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J48 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Particular Labor Markets; Public Policy

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