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Increasing the length of parents' birth-related leave: The effect on children's long-term educational outcomes

Listed author(s):
  • Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz
Registered author(s):

    Investments in children are generally seen as investments in the future economy. In this study I focus on time investments in children as I investigate the long-term educational effects on children of increasing parents' birth-related leave from 14 to 20Â weeks using a natural experiment from 1984 in Denmark. The causal effect of the reform is identified using regression discontinuity design to compare a population sample of children born shortly before and shortly after the reform took effect. Results indicate that increasing parents' access to birth-related leave has no measurable effect on children's long-term educational outcomes. Mothers' incomes and career opportunities are slightly positively affected by the reform.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927-5371(09)00078-5
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Labour Economics.

    Volume (Year): 17 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 91-100

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:17:y:2010:i:1:p:91-100
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco

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