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The Long-term Effects of Maternal Employment on Daughters’ Later Labour Force Participation and Earnings

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  • Catherine Deri-Armstrong

    () (Department of Economics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON
    Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario
    School of Public Policy & Administration, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario)

Abstract

This paper investigates the long-term effects of maternal labour force participation on daughters’ later labour force participation and earnings. The majority of the existing work in this area investigates how current maternal labour force participation affects current child outcomes, including scholastic, behavioural and health outcomes. The Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), a 20 percent random sample of Canadian tax filers provides a unique opportunity to link information regarding a mother’s labour force participation from the birth of a daughter onward, to the daughter’s own labour force participation in later years. We find that maternal employment is correlated with both an increased likelihood of working and increased earnings, but that no long term effects remain once unobserved heterogeneity is addressed. These findings call into question the growing concern that a large body of research has raised regarding the negative impacts of maternal employment on child outcomes

Suggested Citation

  • Catherine Deri-Armstrong, 2009. "The Long-term Effects of Maternal Employment on Daughters’ Later Labour Force Participation and Earnings," Working Papers 0914E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ott:wpaper:0914e
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    File URL: http://sciencessociales.uottawa.ca/economics/sites/socialsciences.uottawa.ca.economics/files/0914E.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Raymundo Miguel Campos-Vazquez & Roberto Velez-Grajales, 2014. "Female Labour Supply and Intergenerational Preference Formation: Evidence for Mexico," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(4), pages 553-569, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    maternal employment; earnings; labour force participation;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs

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