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Female labour supply and intergenerational preference formation: Evidence for Mexico

Author

Listed:
  • Raymundo M. Campos-Vazquez

    () (El Colegio de Mexico)

  • Roberto Velez-Grajales

    (Centro de Estudios Espinosa Yglesias)

Abstract

Using a national representative sample for Mexico, we analyse the effect of a husband having a working mother on the probability that he has a working wife. Our results show that labour force participation by a husband’s mother increases the probability of the labour force participation of his wife by 15 percentage points. The effect is mainly driven by males with less than a high school education. One possible confounding factor is the effect of labour force participation of the wife’s mother on the wife’s labour participation decision. However, in a different sample, we do not find any effect of work force participation of wives’ mothers on wives’ decisions to join the labour force. Finally, we test the effect of the work force participation of a husband’s mother on the husband’s preferences regarding child-rearing practices. We find that having a working mother strongly reduces the probability that daughters will be tasked to care for siblings and fosters preferences for a more egalitarian allocation of educational resources among children. Hence, promoting female labour force participation can have important dynamic implications, especially for developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Raymundo M. Campos-Vazquez & Roberto Velez-Grajales, 2013. "Female labour supply and intergenerational preference formation: Evidence for Mexico," Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos 2013-06, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos.
  • Handle: RePEc:emx:ceedoc:2013-06
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    File URL: http://cee.colmex.mx/documentos/documentos-de-trabajo/2013/dt20136.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Evangelia Papapetrou & Pinelopi Tsalaporta, 2017. "Is there a case for intergenerational transmission of female labour force participation and educational attainment? Evidence from Greece during the crisis," Working Papers 223, Bank of Greece.
    2. Alice Evans, 2016. "‘For the Elections, We Want Women!’: Closing the Gender Gap in Zambian Politics," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 47(2), pages 388-411, March.
    3. Victor Gay, 2017. "The Legacy of the Missing Men: The Long-Run Impact of World War I on Female Labor Force Participation," 2017 Papers pga905, Job Market Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    female labour supply; family; preferences; social norms; role models;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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