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Does Early Educational Tracking Increase Migrant-Native Achievement Gaps? Differences-In-Differences Evidence Across Countries

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Listed:
  • Jens Ruhose

    () (Ifo Institute and IZA, Munich, Germany)

  • Guido Schwerdt

    () (Department of Economics, University of Konstanz, Germany)

Abstract

We study whether early tracking of students based on ability increases migrant-native achievement gaps. To eliminate confounding impacts of unobserved country traits, we employ a differences-in-differences strategy that exploits international variation in the age of tracking as well as student achievement before and after potential tracking. Based on pooled data from 12 large-scale international student assessments, we show that cross-sectional estimates are likely to be downward-biased. Our differences-in-differences estimates suggest that early tracking does not significantly affect overall migrant-native achievement gaps, but we find evidence for a detrimental impact for less integrated migrants.

Suggested Citation

  • Jens Ruhose & Guido Schwerdt, 2015. "Does Early Educational Tracking Increase Migrant-Native Achievement Gaps? Differences-In-Differences Evidence Across Countries," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2015-06, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
  • Handle: RePEc:knz:dpteco:1506
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    File URL: http://www.uni-konstanz.de/FuF/wiwi/workingpaperseries/WP_6_Schwerdt_2015.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nicole Schneeweis & Martina Zweimüller, 2014. "Early Tracking and the Misfortune of Being Young," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 116(2), pages 394-428, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ludger Woessmann, 2016. "The Importance of School Systems: Evidence from International Differences in Student Achievement," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 3-32, Summer.
    2. Lemmermann, Dominique & Riphahn, Regina T., 2018. "The causal effect of age at migration on youth educational attainment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 78-99.
    3. Ralph Hippe & Maciej Jakubowski & Luisa De Sousa Lobo Borges de Araujo, 2018. "Regional inequalities in PISA: the case of Italy and Spain," JRC Working Papers JRC109057, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    4. Ralph Hippe & Luisa De Sousa Lobo Borges de Araujo & Patricia Dinis Mota da Costa, 2016. "Equity in Education in Europe," JRC Working Papers JRC104595, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    5. Yuchen Guo & Till Nikolka & Katrin Oesingmann, 2016. "Schooling Institutions and the Influence of Parental and Immigrant Background on Academic Performance," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 14(2), pages 68-71, 07.
    6. Eric Hanushek, 2019. "Addressing Cross-National Generalizability in Educational Impact Evaluation," Working Papers 2019-007, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    7. Contini, Dalit & Cugnata, Federica, 2016. "Learning inequalities between primary and secondary school. Difference-in-difference with international assessments," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201607, University of Turin.
    8. Tuomas Pekkarinen, 2018. "School tracking and intergenerational social mobility," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-56, December.
    9. repec:ces:ifodic:v:14:y:2016:i:2:p:19235744 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Esser, Hartmut & Relikowski, Ilona, 2015. "Is Ability Tracking (Really) Responsible for Educational Inequalities in Achievement? A Comparison between the Country States Bavaria and Hesse in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 9082, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. De Paola, Maria & Brunello, Giorgio, 2016. "Education as a Tool for the Economic Integration of Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 9836, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Cordero, José Manuel & Cristobal, Victor & Santín, Daniel, 2017. "Causal Inference on Education Policies: A Survey of Empirical Studies Using PISA, TIMSS and PIRLS," MPRA Paper 76295, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Ralph Hippe & Maciej Jakubowski, 2018. "Immigrant background and expected early school leaving in Europe: evidence from PISA," JRC Working Papers JRC109065, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    14. Contini, Dalit & Cugnata, Federica, 2018. "How do institutions affect learning inequalities? Revisiting difference-in-difference models with international assessments," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201817, University of Turin.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; educational inequalities; educational tracking; differences-in-differences;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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