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Migrant Youths' Educational Achievement: The Role of Institutions

  • Deborah Cobb-Clark

    ()

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, University of Melbourne, and Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA))

  • Mathias Sinning

    ()

    (Australian National University, RWI, and Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA))

  • Steven Stillman

    ()

    (University of Otago and Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA))

We use 2009 Programme of International Student Assessment (PISA) data to link institutional arrangements in OECD countries to the disparity in reading, math, and science test scores for migrant and native-born students. We find that achievement gaps are larger for those migrant youths who arrive later and for those who do not speak the test language at home. Institutional arrangements often serve to mitigate the achievement gaps of some migrant students while leaving unaffected or exacerbating those of others. For example, earlier school starting ages help migrant youths in some cases, but by no means in all. Limited tracking on ability appears beneficial for migrants' relative achievement, while complete tracking and a large private school sector appear detrimental. Migrant students' achievement relative to their native-born peers suffers as educational spending and teachers' salaries increase, but is improved when examination is a component of the process for evaluating teachers.

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Paper provided by Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London in its series CReAM Discussion Paper Series with number 1120.

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Date of creation: Nov 2011
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Handle: RePEc:crm:wpaper:1120
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  17. Abdurrahman Aydemir & Wen-Hao Chen & Miles Corak, 2013. "Intergenerational Education Mobility among the Children of Canadian Immigrants," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 39(s1), pages 107-122, May.
  18. Hoyt Bleakley & Aimee Chin, 2009. "Age at Arrival, English Proficiency, and Social Assimilation Among U.S. Immigrants," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0913, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
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  22. Joachim R. Frick & Gert G. Wagner, 2000. "Short Term Living Conditions and Long Term Prospects of Immigrant Children in Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 229, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  23. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2003. "On The Specification and Estimation of The Production Function for Cognitive Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages F3-F33, February.
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