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Differences in educational attainment by country of origin: Evidence from Australia

Author

Listed:
  • Jaai Parasnis
  • Jemma Swan

Abstract

This study investigates native-migrant differences in engagement in post-school education. Using a longitudinal survey of youth in Australia, we find that immigrants originating from non-English speaking countries are significantly more likely to continue with further study between the ages of 18 and 23. On the other hand, there are no significant differences between immigrants from English-speaking countries and native youth. We find several important factors influencing study decisions, including parents and family background, academic ability, aspirations and age at migration; however, accounting for these factors does not fully explain the higher probability of pursuing higher education for immigrants from non-English speaking countries. Exploring the country of origin effect, we find that immigrants from countries with low tertiary education levels are more likely to study in Australia, while differences in parental attitudes in their origin countries do not have a significant effect. The results show the importance of country of origin on the study decisions of youth, which should be taken into account when formulating migration and education policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Jaai Parasnis & Jemma Swan, 2017. "Differences in educational attainment by country of origin: Evidence from Australia," Monash Economics Working Papers 05-17, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2017-05
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    File URL: http://business.monash.edu/economics/research/publications/eco/0517differencesparasnisswan.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; educational achievement; human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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