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Cultural capital and its effects on education outcomes

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  • Tramonte, Lucia
  • Willms, J. Douglas

Abstract

In this study we distinguished between two forms of cultural capital, one that is static, representing the highbrow activities and practices of parents, and one that is relational, representing cultural interactions and communication between children and their parents. We used data for 28 countries from the 2000 Programme for International Student Assessment to examine whether these two types of cultural capital were associated with students' reading literacy, sense of belonging at school, and occupational aspirations, after controlling for traditional measures of socioeconomic status. We examined whether one type of cultural capital had stronger effects than the other and whether their effects differed across outcomes and across countries. The results provide compelling evidence that dynamic cultural capital has strong effects on students' schooling outcomes, while static cultural capital has more modest effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Tramonte, Lucia & Willms, J. Douglas, 2010. "Cultural capital and its effects on education outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 200-213, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:29:y:2010:i:2:p:200-213
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hille, Adrian & Schupp, Jürgen, 2015. "How Learning a Musical Instrument Affects the Development of Skills," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 56-82.
    2. José Manuel Cordero Ferrera & Manuel Muñiz Pérez & Rosa Simancas Rodríguez, 2015. "The influence of socioeconomic factors on cognitive and non-cognitive educational outcomes," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 10,in: Marta Rahona López & Jennifer Graves (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 10, edition 1, volume 10, chapter 21, pages 413-438 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    3. Troels Krarup & Martin D. Munk, 2014. "Field theory in cultural capital studies of educational attainment," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/4liqn3p9mp9, Sciences Po.
    4. Cornelia Woll, 2014. "Bank Rescue Schemes in Continental Europe: The Power of Collective Inaction," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/6h0jh7hlm79, Sciences Po.
    5. Destin, Mesmin, 2013. "Integrating resource-based and person-based approaches to understanding wealth effects on school achievement," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 171-178.
    6. Antonello E. Scorcu & Laura Vici, 2013. "Economic and cultural factors and illegal copying in the university textbook market," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-01-2013, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Feb 2013.
    7. Bowden, Mark P. & Doughney, James, 2012. "The importance of cultural and economic influences behind the decision to attend higher education," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 95-103.
    8. Kamanda, Mamusu & Madise, Nyovani & Schnepf, Sylke, 2016. "Does living in a community with more educated mothers enhance children's school attendance? Evidence from Sierra Leone," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 114-124.
    9. Chiapa, Carlos & Garrido, José Luis & Prina, Silvia, 2012. "The effect of social programs and exposure to professionals on the educational aspirations of the poor," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 778-798.
    10. Jaai Parasnis & Jemma Swan, 2017. "Differences in educational attainment by country of origin: Evidence from Australia," Monash Economics Working Papers 05-17, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    11. Marie-Louise Damen & Chris Klaveren, 2013. "Did Cultural and Artistic Education in the Netherlands increase Student Participation in High Cultural Events?," De Economist, Springer, vol. 161(4), pages 447-462, December.
    12. Silles, Mary A., 2011. "The intergenerational effects of parental schooling on the cognitive and non-cognitive development of children," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 258-268, April.

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