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Education and Early Career Outcomes of Second-Generation Immigrants in France

Author

Listed:
  • Christian Belzil

    () (Department of Economics, Ecole Polytechnique - X - École polytechnique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • François Poinas

    (GATE - Groupe d'analyse et de théorie économique - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - Ecole Normale Supérieure Lettres et Sciences Humaines - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

We estimate a flexible dynamic model of education choices and early career employment outcomes of the French population. Individuals are allowed to choose between 4 options: continue to the next grade, accept a permanent contract, accept a temporary contract, or withdraw from the labor force (a residual state). Our analysis focuses on the comparison between French Second-Generation Immigrants whose parents are born in Africa and French-natives. We find that schooling attainments explain around two thirds of the differences in access to early career employment stability. However, one third cannot be linked to observed investment in human capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Belzil & François Poinas, 2008. "Education and Early Career Outcomes of Second-Generation Immigrants in France," Post-Print halshs-00355660, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00355660
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00355660
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Keane, Michael P., 2010. "Structural vs. atheoretic approaches to econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 156(1), pages 3-20, May.
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    15. Romain Aeberhardt & Denis Fougère & Julien Pouget & Roland Rathelot, 2010. "Wages and employment of French workers with African origin," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(3), pages 881-905, June.
    16. Belzil, Christian & Hansen, Jörgen, 2008. "Calibration and IV Estimation of a Wage Outcome Equation in a Dynamic Environment," IZA Discussion Papers 3528, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Helena Skyt Nielsen & Michael Rosholm & Nina Smith & Leif Husted, 2003. "The school-to-work transition of 2 nd generation immigrants in Denmark," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(4), pages 755-786, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Annabelle Krause & Ulf Rinne & Simone Schüller, 2015. "Kick It Like Özil? Decomposing the Native-Migrant Education Gap," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 757-789, September.
    2. repec:mse:cesdoc:09059r is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Sweetman, A. & van Ours, J.C., 2014. "Immigration : What About the Children and Grandchildren?," Discussion Paper 2014-009, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    4. Simone Schüller, 2015. "Parental ethnic identity and educational attainment of second-generation immigrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 965-1004, October.
    5. Clémence Berson, 2009. "Private vs. Public Sector: Discrimination against Second-Generation Immigrants in France," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00423944, HAL.
    6. Clémence Berson, 2009. "Private vs. Public Sector: Discrimination against Second-Generation Immigrants in France," Post-Print halshs-00423944, HAL.
    7. Baert, Stijn & Cockx, Bart, 2013. "Pure ethnic gaps in educational attainment and school to work transitions: When do they arise?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 276-294.
    8. Baert, Stijn & Neyt, Brecht & Omey, Eddy & Verhaest, Dieter, 2017. "Student Work, Educational Achievement, and Later Employment: A Dynamic Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 11127, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Emilia Ene Jones & Florent Sari, 2016. "L’adresse contribue-t-elle à expliquer les écarts de salaires ?. Le cas de jeunes sortant du système scolaire," Revue d'économie régionale et urbaine, Armand Colin, vol. 0(1), pages 203-244.
    10. Johannes S. Kunz, 2016. "Analyzing Educational Achievement Differences between Second-Generation Immigrants: Comparing Germany and German-Speaking Switzerland," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 17(1), pages 61-91, February.
    11. Gabin Langevin & David Masclet & Fabien Moizeau & Emmanuel Peterlé, 2013. "Educational Attainment, Wages and Employment of Second-Generation Immigrants in France," CIRANO Working Papers 2013s-33, CIRANO.
    12. Berrittella, Maria, 2012. "Modelling the labour market of minority ethnic groups," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 389-402.
    13. Denis Fougère, 2011. "Social and Labor Market Integration of Ethnic Minorities in France: Has the French Integration Model Broken Down?," Chapters,in: Ethnic Diversity in European Labor Markets, chapter 5 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    14. Kristina A. Schapiro, 2009. "Migration and Educational Outcomes of Children," Human Development Research Papers (2009 to present) HDRP-2009-57, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), revised Oct 2009.
    15. Belzil, Christian & Poinas, François, 2018. "Estimating a Model of Qualitative and Quantitative Education Choices in France," TSE Working Papers 18-908, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    16. Messinis, George, 2013. "Returns to education and urban-migrant wage differentials in China: IV quantile treatment effects," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 39-55.
    17. repec:taf:edecon:v:25:y:2017:i:1:p:84-111 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Winkler, Oliver, 2014. "Transitions into Stable Employment: The Effect of Relative Group Size for the Immigrant Second Generation in France," MPRA Paper 62967, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Jaai Parasnis & Jemma Swan, 2017. "Differences in educational attainment by country of origin: Evidence from Australia," Monash Economics Working Papers 05-17, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    20. Gabin Langevin & David Masclet & Fabien Moizeau & Emmanuel Peterle, 2017. "Ethnic gaps in educational attainment and labor-market outcomes: evidence from France," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 84-111, January.
    21. Vincent Corluy & Gerlinde Verbist, 2014. "Can education bridge the gap? Education and the employment position of immigrants in Belgium," ImPRovE Working Papers 14/02, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Second-generation immigrants; schooling attainments; fixed term employment;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts

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