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Better migrants, better PISA results: Findings from a natural experiment

Listed author(s):
  • Maria Cattaneo

    ()

  • Stefan Wolter

    ()

Switzerland changed its migration policy in the 1990s from a “non-qualified only” policy to one of almost free movement of labor. To analyze the impact of this policy change on the schooling outcomes of children of first-generation migrants, the paper compares the PISA results of first-generation pupils in 2000 with the scores of children tested in 2009, whose parents immigrated after the policy changed. We find that around 75% of the 40-point increase in the PISA score of first-generation immigrant students was due to changes in the individual background characteristics of their parents and to improved school composition. Copyright Cattaneo and Wolter. 2015

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1186/s40176-015-0042-y
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Article provided by Springer & Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA) in its journal IZA Journal of Migration.

Volume (Year): 4 (2015)
Issue (Month): 1 (December)
Pages: 1-19

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Handle: RePEc:spr:izamig:v:4:y:2015:i:1:p:1-19:10.1186/s40176-015-0042-y
DOI: 10.1186/s40176-015-0042-y
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