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Contribution des inobservables aux disparités de genre dans la scolarisation et le travail des enfants au Mali
[Contribution of unobservables to gender disparities in schooling and child labor in Mali]

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  • Keita, Moussa

Abstract

This study attempts to extend reflections on gender disparities in children's time allocation based on household survey data in Mali. We test the gender disparities in schooling and child labor using the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition. The objective is to identify the contributions of unobservable factors to the differences between girls and boys. Our results confirm the idea that most of the differences between the two groups comes from unobservable factors. We find, for example, that 92% of the difference in schooling remains unexplained based on observable characteristics. We also find evidence of a strong polarization of work by gender. Boys are significantly more oriented toward economic activities (1 hour per day girls) while girls are significantly more oriented toward non-economic activities (about 2.5 hours per day more than boys).

Suggested Citation

  • Keita, Moussa, 2014. "Contribution des inobservables aux disparités de genre dans la scolarisation et le travail des enfants au Mali [Contribution of unobservables to gender disparities in schooling and child labor in M," MPRA Paper 57532, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:57532
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nicole M. Fortin & Philip Oreopoulos & Shelley Phipps, 2015. "Leaving Boys Behind: Gender Disparities in High Academic Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(3), pages 549-579.
    2. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
    3. André Portela Souza, 2007. "Child Labor, School Attendance, and Intrahousehold Gender Bias in Brazil," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 301-316, March.
    4. Kaushik Basu, 2006. "Gender and Say: a Model of Household Behaviour with Endogenously Determined Balance of Power," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(511), pages 558-580, April.
    5. Cotton, Jeremiah, 1988. "On the Decomposition of Wage Differentials," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(2), pages 236-243, May.
    6. Reimers, Cordelia W, 1983. "Labor Market Discrimination against Hispanic and Black Men," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(4), pages 570-579, November.
    7. David Neumark, 1988. "Employers' Discriminatory Behavior and the Estimation of Wage Discrimination," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(3), pages 279-295.
    8. Oaxaca, Ronald L. & Ransom, Michael R., 1994. "On discrimination and the decomposition of wage differentials," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 5-21, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Scolarisation; travail des enfants; disparités de genre / Schooling; child labor; gender disparities;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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