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Non-Native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What Are the Effects on Pupil Performance?

Author

Listed:
  • Geay, Charlotte

    (Paris Graduate School of Economics, ENSAE)

  • McNally, Sandra

    () (London School of Economics)

  • Telhaj, Shqiponja

    () (London School of Economics)

Abstract

In recent years there has been an increase in the number of children going to school in England who do not speak English as a first language. We investigate whether this has an impact on the educational outcomes of native English speakers at the end of primary school. We show that the negative correlation observed in the raw data is mainly an artefact of selection: non-native speakers are more likely to attend school with disadvantaged native speakers. We attempt to identify a causal impact of changes in the percentage of non-native speakers within the year group. In general, our results suggest zero effect and rule out negative effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Geay, Charlotte & McNally, Sandra & Telhaj, Shqiponja, 2012. "Non-Native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What Are the Effects on Pupil Performance?," IZA Discussion Papers 6451, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6451
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christian Dustmann & Stephen Machin & Uta Schoenberg, 2008. "Educational Achievement and Ethnicity in Compulsory Schooling," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0812, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
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    5. Asako Ohinata & Jan C. van Ours, 2013. "How Immigrant Children Affect the Academic Achievement of Native Dutch Children," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0, pages 308-331, August.
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    12. Steve Gibbons & Shqiponja Telhaj, 2008. "Peers and Achievement in England's Secondary Schools," SERC Discussion Papers 0001, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    educational attainment; non-native English speakers;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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