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Do Foreign Students Crowd Out Native Students from Graduate Programs?

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  • George J. Borjas

Abstract

This paper examines how the growth in the number of foreign students enrolled in graduate programs affects native enrollment in those programs. Although there is little evidence of a crowdout effect for the typical native student, the impact of foreign students on native educational outcomes differs dramatically across ethnic groups, and is particularly adverse for white native men. There is a strong negative correlation between increases in the number of foreign students enrolled at a particular university and the number of white native men in that university's graduate program. This crowdout effect is strongest at the most elite institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • George J. Borjas, 2004. "Do Foreign Students Crowd Out Native Students from Graduate Programs?," NBER Working Papers 10349, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10349
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    1. George J. Borjas, 2000. "Foreign-Born Teaching Assistants and the Academic Performance of Undergraduates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 355-359, May.
    2. George J. Borjas, 1995. "The Economic Benefits from Immigration," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 3-22, Spring.
    3. Belton Fleisher & Masanori Hashimoto & Bruce A. Weinberg, 2002. "Foreign GTAs Can Be Effective Teachers of Economics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(4), pages 299-325, December.
    4. Borjas, George, 2002. "An Evaluation of the Foreign Student Program," Working Paper Series rwp02-026, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    5. Gordon C. Winston, 1999. "Subsidies, Hierarchy and Peers: The Awkward Economics of Higher Education," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(1), pages 13-36, Winter.
    6. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 9755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Asako Ohinata & Jan C. Ours, 2016. "Quantile Peer Effects of Immigrant Children at Primary Schools," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 30(2), pages 135-157, June.
    2. William R. Kerr, 2010. "Breakthrough Inventions and Migrating Clusters of Innovation," NBER Chapters,in: Cities and Entrepreneurship National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Gordon H. Hanson, 2009. "The Economic Consequences of the International Migration of Labor," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 179-208, May.
    4. Stefano Breschi & Francesco Lissoni & Gianluca Tarasconi, 2014. "Inventor Data for Research on Migration and Innovation: A Survey and a Pilot," WIPO Economic Research Working Papers 17, World Intellectual Property Organization - Economics and Statistics Division.
    5. repec:eee:infome:v:11:y:2017:i:2:p:358-370 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. John Bound & Murat Demirci & Gaurav Khanna & Sarah Turner, 2015. "Finishing Degrees and Finding Jobs: US Higher Education and the Flow of Foreign IT Workers," Innovation Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 27-72.
    7. Eric D. Gould & Victor Lavy & M. Daniele Paserman, 2009. "Does Immigration Affect the Long-Term Educational Outcomes of Natives? Quasi-Experimental Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(540), pages 1243-1269, October.
    8. Chellaraj, Gnanaraj & Maskus, Keith E. & Mattoo, Aaditya, 2005. "The contribution of skilled immigration and international graduate students to U.S. innovation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3588, The World Bank.
    9. Fouarge D. & Özer M.N., 2014. "International mobility of students – Its impact on labour market forecasts and its contribution to the Dutch economy," ROA Technical Report 006, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    10. Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2017. "Do Migrant Students Affect Local Students' Academic Achievements in Urban China?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 130, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    11. Richard G. Harris & Peter E. Robertson, 2007. "The Dynamic Effects of Skilled Labour Targeting in Immigration Programs," Discussion Papers 2007-21, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    12. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Gianandrea Lanzara, 2012. "Educational achievement of second‐generation immigrants: an international comparison," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 27(69), pages 143-185, January.
    13. Anelli, Massimo & Shih, Kevin Y. & Williams, Kevin, 2017. "Foreign Peer Effects and STEM Major Choice," IZA Discussion Papers 10743, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Stevenson, Adam, 2013. "The male–female gap in post-baccalaureate school quality," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 153-165.
    15. John Bound & Sarah Turner, 2010. "Coming to America: Where Do International Doctorate Students Study and How Do US Universities Respond?," NBER Chapters,in: American Universities in a Global Market, pages 101-127 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. William R. Kerr, 2010. "The Agglomeration of U.S. Ethnic Inventors," NBER Chapters,in: Agglomeration Economics, pages 237-276 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Francesco LISSONI, 2016. "Migration and Innovation Diffusion : An Eclectic Survey," Cahiers du GREThA 2016-11, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    18. Victor Lavy & M. Daniele Paserman & Analia Schlosser, 2008. "Inside the Black of Box of Ability Peer Effects: Evidence from Variation in the Proportion of Low Achievers in the Classroom," NBER Working Papers 14415, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Neymotin, Florence, 2009. "Immigration and its effect on the college-going outcomes of natives," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 538-550, October.
    20. Beine, Michel & Noël, Romain & Ragot, Lionel, 2014. "Determinants of the international mobility of students," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 40-54.
    21. William R. Kerr, 2007. "The Ethnic Composition of US Inventors," Harvard Business School Working Papers 08-006, Harvard Business School.
    22. Patrick Gaule & Mario Piacentini, 2015. "Immigration and Innovation: Chinese Graduate Students in U.S. Universities," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp529, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    23. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:63:y:2018:i:c:p:64-77 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. Heinrich Hock & Delia Furtado, 2009. "Female Work and Fertility in the United States: Effects of Low-Skilled Immigrant Labor," Working papers 2009-20, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    25. Lien, Donald, 2006. "On the optimal quality of domestic higher education programs," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 265-275, March.

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    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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