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Immigration and the School System

  • Albornoz-Crespo, Facundo
  • Cabrales, Antonio
  • Hauk, Esther

Immigration is an important problem in many societies, and it has wide-ranging e ects on the educational systems of host countries. There is a now a large empirical literature, but very little theoretical work on this topic. We introduce a model of family immigration in a framework where school quality and student outcomes are determined endogenously. This allows us to explain the selection of immigrants in terms of parental motivation and the policies which favor a positive selection. Also, we can study the e ect of immigration on the school system and how school quality may self-reinforce immigrants' and natives' choices.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 8653.

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Date of creation: Nov 2011
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8653
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  1. Brunello, Giorgio & Rocco, Lorenzo, 2013. "The effect of immigration on the school performance of natives: Cross country evidence using PISA test scores," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 234-246.
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