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Ethnicity and Educational Achievement in Compulsory Schooling

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  • Christian Dustmann
  • Stephen Machin
  • Uta Schönberg

Abstract

This article documents that at the start of school, pupils from most ethnic groups substantially lag behind White British pupils. However, these gaps decline for all groups throughout compulsory schooling. Language is the single most important factor why ethnic minority pupils improve relative to White British pupils. Poverty, in contrast, does not contribute to the catch-up. Our results also suggest the possibility that the greater than average progress of ethnic minority pupils in schools with more poor pupils may partly be related to teacher incentives to concentrate attention on particular pupils, generated by the publication of school league tables. Copyright © The Author(s). Journal compilation © Royal Economic Society 2010.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Dustmann & Stephen Machin & Uta Schönberg, 2010. "Ethnicity and Educational Achievement in Compulsory Schooling," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(546), pages 272-297, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:120:y:2010:i:546:p:f272-f297
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Baert, Stijn & Cockx, Bart, 2013. "Pure ethnic gaps in educational attainment and school to work transitions: When do they arise?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 276-294.
    2. Rajesh Ramachandran & Christopher Rauh & Anh Mai Le, 2016. "Discriminatory attitudes and indigenous language promotion: Challenges and solutions," WIDER Working Paper Series 078, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Gianandrea Lanzara, 2012. "Educational achievement of second‐generation immigrants: an international comparison," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 27(69), pages 143-185, January.
    4. Yao, Yuxin, 2017. "Essays on economics of language and family economics," Other publications TiSEM 0093bc8e-e869-4f87-8ff8-8, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    5. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos, 2010. "Ethnicity and Second Generation Immigrants in Britain," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1004, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    6. Yao, Yuxin & Ohinata, Asako & van Ours, Jan C., 2016. "The Educational Consequences of Language Proficiency for Young Children," IZA Discussion Papers 9800, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Figlio, D. & Karbownik, K. & Salvanes, K.G., 2016. "Education Research and Administrative Data," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    8. repec:taf:edecon:v:25:y:2017:i:1:p:84-111 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:eee:wdevel:v:98:y:2017:i:c:p:195-213 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Miranda, Alfonso & Zhu, Yu, 2013. "The Causal Effect of Deficiency at English on Female Immigrants' Labor Market Outcomes in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 7841, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Facundo Albornoz & Antonio Cabrales & Paula Calvo & Esther Hauk, 2018. "Immigrant children's school performance and immigration costs: Evidence from Spain," Discussion Papers 2018-06, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    12. Tsujita, Yuko, 2013. "Factors that prevent children from gaining access to schooling: A study of Delhi slum households," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 348-357.
    13. Ohinata, Asako & van Ours, Jan C. & Yao, Yuxin, 2016. "The Educational Consequences of Language Proficiency for Young Children," CEPR Discussion Papers 11183, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    14. Douglas Almond & Bhashkar Mazumder & Reyn Ewijk, 2015. "In Utero Ramadan Exposure and Children's Academic Performance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(589), pages 1501-1533, December.
    15. Yao, Yuxin & Ohinata, Asako & van Ours, Jan C., 2016. "The educational consequences of language proficiency for young children," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1-15.
    16. Stijn Baert & Frank W. Heiland & Sanders Korenman, 2016. "Native-Immigrant Gaps in Educational and School-to-Work Transitions in the 2nd Generation: The Role of Gender and Ethnicity," De Economist, Springer, vol. 164(2), pages 159-186, June.
    17. Gabin Langevin & David Masclet & Fabien Moizeau & Emmanuel Peterle, 2017. "Ethnic gaps in educational attainment and labor-market outcomes: evidence from France," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 84-111, January.
    18. Baert, Stijn & Heiland, Frank & Korenman, Sanders, 2014. "Native-Immigrant Gaps in Educational and School-to-Work Transitions in the Second Generation: The Role of Gender and Ethnicity," IZA Discussion Papers 8752, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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