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Wages, Experience and Training of Women over the Lifecycle

Author

Listed:
  • Blundell, Richard

    () (University College London)

  • Goll, David

    () (University College London)

  • Costa Dias, Monica

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies, London)

  • Meghir, Costas

    () (Yale University)

Abstract

We investigate the role of training in reducing the gender wage gap using the UK-BHPS which contains detailed records of training. Using policy changes over an 18 year period we identify the impact of training and work experience on wages, earnings and employment. Based on a lifecycle model and using reforms as a source of exogenous variation we evaluate the role of formal training and experience in defining the evolution of wages and employment careers, conditional on education. Training is potentially important in compensating for the effects of children, especially for women who left education after completing high school.

Suggested Citation

  • Blundell, Richard & Goll, David & Costa Dias, Monica & Meghir, Costas, 2019. "Wages, Experience and Training of Women over the Lifecycle," IZA Discussion Papers 12310, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12310
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. James Heckman & Lance Lochner & Ricardo Cossa, 2002. "Learning-By-Doing Vs. On-the-Job Training: Using Variation Induced by the EITC to Distinguish Between Models of Skill Formation," NBER Working Papers 9083, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Attanasio, Orazio P & Weber, Guglielmo, 1995. "Is Consumption Growth Consistent with Intertemporal Optimization? Evidence from the Consumer Expenditure Survey," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1121-1157, December.
    3. Lentz, Rasmus & Roys, Nicolas, 2015. "Training and Search on the Job," Working Papers 2016-25, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    4. Brewer, Mike & Duncan, Alan & Shephard, Andrew & Suarez, Maria Jose, 2006. "Did working families' tax credit work? The impact of in-work support on labour supply in Great Britain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 699-720, December.
    5. Richard Blundell & Lorraine Dearden & Barbara Sianesi, 2005. "Evaluating the effect of education on earnings: models, methods and results from the National Child Development Survey," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 168(3), pages 473-512.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender wage gap; training; human capital; labor supply;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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