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Worker Characteristics, Job Characteristics, and the Receipt of On-the-Job Training


  • Joseph G. Altonji
  • James R. Spletzer


The authors examine the relationship between the receipt of employer-provided training and the characteristics of workers and jobs using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of the High School Class of 1972 and the Dictionary of Occupational Titles. They find that the intensity of training and the duration of training were negatively related; the incidence of training was slightly higher among women than among men, but the amount of training was higher among men; blacks received somewhat more training than whites; post-secondary education had a strong positive relationship with training; and aptitude had a positive effect on training. Training does not appear to have been affected by high school curriculum or by observable and unobservable factors specific to the individual's high school.

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  • Joseph G. Altonji & James R. Spletzer, 1991. "Worker Characteristics, Job Characteristics, and the Receipt of On-the-Job Training," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 45(1), pages 58-79, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:45:y:1991:i:1:p:58-79

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Achyuta Adhvaryu & Namrata Kala & Anant Nyshadham, 2018. "The Skills to Pay the Bills: Returns to On-the-job Soft Skills Training," NBER Working Papers 24313, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Mohrenweiser, Jens & Wydra-Sommaggio, Gaby & Zwick, Thomas, 2014. "Adverse Selection and Information Advantages of Training Firms," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100525, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. repec:aea:jeclit:v:55:y:2017:i:3:p:789-865 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Joseph G. Altonji, 1995. "The Effects of High School Curriculum on Education and Labor Market Outcomes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(3), pages 409-438.
    5. David H. Autor, 2001. "Why Do Temporary Help Firms Provide Free General Skills Training?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1409-1448.
    6. Heisz, Andrew & Oreopoulos, Philip, 2006. "The Importance of Signalling in Job Placement and Promotion," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2006236e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    7. Parent, Daniel, 1999. "Wages and Mobility: The Impact of Employer-Provided Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(2), pages 298-317, April.
    8. Juan J. Dolado & Cecilia García-Peñalosa & Sara De La Rica, 2013. "On Gender Gaps And Self-Fulfilling Expectations: Alternative Implications Of Paid-For Training," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 51(3), pages 1829-1848, July.
    9. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2017. "The Gender Wage Gap: Extent, Trends, and Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(3), pages 789-865, September.
    10. Munasinghe, Lalith & Reif, Tania & Henriques, Alice, 2008. "Gender gap in wage returns to job tenure and experience," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 1296-1316, December.
    11. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Gylfi Zoega, 2003. "Unions, Work-Related Training, and Wages: Evidence for British Men," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 57(1), pages 68-91, October.
    12. Loewenstein, Mark A & Spletzer, James R, 1998. "Dividing the Costs and Returns to General Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 142-171, January.
    13. Dostie, Benoit & Javdani, Mohsen, 2017. "Not for the Profit, but for the Training? Gender Differences in Training in the For-Profit and Non-Profit Sectors," IZA Discussion Papers 11108, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Andrea Cegolon, 2015. "Determinants and Learning Effects of Adult Education-Training: a Cross-National Comparison Using PIAAC Data," DoQSS Working Papers 15-11, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    15. Carlos Peraita, 2001. "Firm Sponsored Training In Regulated Labor Markets: Evidence From Spain," Working Papers. Serie EC 2001-15, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    16. Stephen L. Ross, 2003. "What Is Known about Testing for Discrimination: Lessons Learned by Comparing across Different Markets," Working papers 2003-21, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Nov 2003.
    17. Dunne, Timothy & Haltiwanger, John & Troske, Kenneth R., 1997. "Technology and jobs: secular changes and cyclical dynamics," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 107-178, June.
    18. Kuan Xu & Zhengxi Lin, 2007. "Participation in Employer-sponsored Training in Canada: Role of Firm Characteristics and Worker Attributes," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive paperb1_7_ic_workingpaper, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
    19. Almeida, Rita K. & Aterido, Reyes, 2011. "On-the-job training and rigidity of employment protection in the developing world: Evidence from differential enforcement," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(S1), pages 71-82.
    20. Lisa M. Lynch, 1992. "Differential Effects of Post-School Training on Early Career Mobility," NBER Working Papers 4034, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pc:p:3143-3259 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Barron, John M & Berger, Mark C & Black, Dan A, 1997. "How Well Do We Measure Training?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(3), pages 507-528, July.
    23. Stephen G. Bronars & Melissa Famulari, 1998. "Employer-Provided Training, Wages, and Capital Investment," NBER Chapters,in: Labor Statistics Measurement Issues, pages 431-461 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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