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Search, Matching, and Training

Listed author(s):
  • Christopher Flinn

    (NYU)

  • Ahu Gemici

    (Royal Holloway)

  • Steven Laufer

    (Federal Reserve Board)

We estimate a partial and general equilibrium search model in which firms and workers choose how much time to invest in both general and match-specific human capital. To help identify the model parameters, we use NLSY data on worker training and we match moments that relate the incidence and timing of observed training episodes to outcomes such as wage growth and job-to-job transitions. We use our model to offer a novel interpretation of standard Mincer wage regressions in terms of search frictions and returns to training. We use our model estimates to investigate the impact of minimum wages on training and outcomes, and find significant impacts on both of these dimensions for sufficiently high minimum wage values. (Copyright: Elsevier)

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.red.2017.02.003
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Article provided by Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics in its journal Review of Economic Dynamics.

Volume (Year): 25 (2017)
Issue (Month): (April)
Pages: 260-297

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Handle: RePEc:red:issued:16-105
DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2017.02.003
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Marina Azzimonti, Department of Economics, Stonybrook University, 10 Nicolls Road, Stonybrook NY 11790 USA

Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/red/
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  1. Donghoon Lee, 2005. "An Estimable Dynamic General Equilibrium Model Of Work, Schooling, And Occupational Choice," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(1), pages 1-34, 02.
  2. Frédéric Gavrel & Jean-Pascal Guironnet & Isabelle Lebon, 2012. "Mismatch, On-the-job Training, and Unemployment," Economics Working Paper Archive (University of Rennes 1 & University of Caen) 201224, Center for Research in Economics and Management (CREM), University of Rennes 1, University of Caen and CNRS.
  3. Brown, James N, 1989. "Why Do Wages Increase with Tenure? On-the-Job Training and Life-Cycle Wage Growth Observed within Firms," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 971-991, December.
  4. Cristian Bartolucci, 2013. "Gender Wage Gaps Reconsidered: A Structural Approach Using Matched Employer-Employee Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(4), pages 998-1034.
  5. Matthew S. Dey & Christopher J. Flinn, 2005. "An Equilibrium Model of Health Insurance Provision and Wage Determination," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 571-627, 03.
  6. Lentz, Rasmus & Roys, Nicolas, 2015. "Training and Search on the Job," Working Papers 2016-25, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  7. James Mabli & Christopher Flinn, 2007. "On-the-Job Search, Minimum Wages, and Labor Market Outcomes in an Equilibrium Bargaining Framework," 2007 Meeting Papers 791, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  8. Neumark, David & Wascher, William, 2003. "Minimum wages and skill acquisition: another look at schooling effects," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 1-10, February.
  9. David Neumark & Olena Nizalova, 2007. "Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(2).
  10. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Equilibrium Unemployment Theory, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262161877, January.
  11. Hashimoto, Masanori, 1982. "Minimum Wage Effects on Training on the Job," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(5), pages 1070-1087, December.
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