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The Gendered Effects of Career Concerns on Fertility

Author

Listed:
  • Nayoung Rim

    () (United States Naval Academy)

  • Kyung Park

    () (Wellesley College)

Abstract

A growing literature reveals that the adverse effect of children on career advancement falls disproportionately on women. This raises the possibility that women respond to career concerns by delaying family formation more than men. Using a panel dataset on lawyers, we find females are less likely to have their first child before the promotion decision. This fertility gap is not explained away by gender-based sorting or gender differences in marriage-timing and spousal occupation. Two channels drive our results: women bear child-rearing costs and gender-specific promotion thresholds. This implies the focus on the gender wage gap understates gender inequality in the labor market.

Suggested Citation

  • Nayoung Rim & Kyung Park, 2017. "The Gendered Effects of Career Concerns on Fertility," Departmental Working Papers 59, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:usn:usnawp:59
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    References listed on IDEAS

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