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Fertility Transitions along the Extensive and Intensive Margin

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  • Fabian Lange

    (McGill University)

  • Daniel Aaronson

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago)

Abstract

By allowing for an extensive margin in the standard quantity-quality, we generate new insights into fertility transitions. We test the model on Southern black women affected by a large-scale school construction program. Consistent with our model, women facing improved schooling opportunities for their children were more likely to have at least one child but chose to have smaller families overall. By contrast, women who themselves obtained more schooling due to the program delayed childbearing along both the extensive and intensive margins and entered higher quality occupations, consistent with education raising opportunity costs of child rearing.

Suggested Citation

  • Fabian Lange & Daniel Aaronson, 2014. "Fertility Transitions along the Extensive and Intensive Margin," 2014 Meeting Papers 211, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed014:211
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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