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Education and Fertility: Panel Evidence from sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Carolyn Chisadza

    () (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

  • Manoel Bittencourt

    () (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

Abstract

We study the effects of different levels of education on fertility in 48 sub-Saharan African countries between 1970 and 2010. The results, based on panel data analysis with fi?xed effects and instrumental variables, show how that lower education levels do not have a significant effect on people?s fertility decisions. However, the results from the higher education levels suggest otherwise. They are indicative of a region that is transitioning from the Malthusian epoch to a modern growth regime in which people substitute quantity for quality of children. Lower fertility implies less strain on public expenditure, higher human capital and higher productivity which can lead to sustained economic growth as witnessed in most developed regions today.

Suggested Citation

  • Carolyn Chisadza & Manoel Bittencourt, 2015. "Education and Fertility: Panel Evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 201526, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pre:wpaper:201526
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:rnd:arjebs:v:10:y:2019:i:6:p:89-96 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    education; fertility; sub-Saharan Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development

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