IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/aea/aecrev/v98y2008i2p403-07.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Understanding the Returns to Delayed Childbearing for Working Women

Author

Listed:
  • Kasey Buckles

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Kasey Buckles, 2008. "Understanding the Returns to Delayed Childbearing for Working Women," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 403-407, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:98:y:2008:i:2:p:403-07
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.98.2.403
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.98.2.403
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to AEA members and institutional subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Akira Momota & Ryo Horii, 2013. "Timing of childbirth, capital accumulation, and economic welfare," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 494-522, April.
    2. Elizabeth Ty Wilde & Lily Batchelder & David T. Ellwood, 2010. "The Mommy Track Divides: The Impact of Childbearing on Wages of Women of Differing Skill Levels," NBER Working Papers 16582, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Sylvain Dessy & Setou Diarra & Roland Pongou, 2017. "Underage Brides and Grooms’ Education," Working Papers 1704E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    4. Michael Kind & Jan Kleibrink, 2012. "Time Is Money: The Influence of Parenthood Timing on Wages," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 467, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    5. Moriguchi, Chiaki, 2012. "The Evolution of Child Adoption in the United States, 1950-2010—An Economic Analysis of Historical Trends—," Economic Review, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 63(3), pages 265-285, July.
    6. Nayoung Rim & Kyung Park, 2017. "The Gendered Effects of Career Concerns on Fertility," Departmental Working Papers 59, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.
    7. Rannveig Kaldager Hart, 2015. "Earnings and first birth probability among Norwegian men and women 1995-2010," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(38), pages 1067-1104, November.
    8. Michael Kind & Jan Kleibrink, 2012. "Time is Money – The Influence of Parenthood Timing on Wages," Ruhr Economic Papers 0344, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    9. Sylvain Dessy, Setou Diarra, Roland Pongou & Setou Diarra & Roland Pongou, 2016. "Adolescent Brides and Grooms' Education: Theory and Evidence," Cahiers de recherche 1610, Centre de recherche sur les risques, les enjeux économiques, et les politiques publiques.
    10. Fane Groes & Daniela Iorio & Man Yee (Mallory) Leung & Raül Santaeulàlia-Llopis, 2017. "Educational Disparities in the Battle Against Infertility: Evidence from IVF Success," Working Papers 977, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    11. Millán-Quijano, Jaime, 2015. "Drugs, guns and early motherhood in Colombia," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1509, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    12. Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2009. "Accommodating Families," Chapters,in: Labor and Employment Law and Economics, chapter 11 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    13. Dessy, Sylvain & Diarra, Setou & Pongou, Roland, 2017. "Underage Brides and Grooms' Education," MPRA Paper 77326, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Hrishikesh D. Vinod, 2008. "Consumer Debt is 130% of Income: Avoiding Budget Constraint Orthodoxy," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series dp2008-13, Fordham University, Department of Economics.
    15. Sara Cools & Marte Strøm, 2016. "Parenthood wage penalties in a double income society," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 391-416, June.
    16. repec:zbw:rwirep:0344 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Boschini, Anne & Håkanson, Christina & Rosén, Åsa & Sjögren, Anna, 2011. "Trading off or having it all? Completed fertility and mid-career earnings of Swedish men and women," Working Paper Series 2011:15, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    18. Tarjei Havnes & Magne Mogstad, 2011. "No Child Left Behind: Subsidized Child Care and Children's Long-Run Outcomes," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 97-129, May.
    19. repec:kap:atlecj:v:45:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11293-017-9546-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Sara Oloomi, 2016. "Impact of Paid Family Leave of California on Delayed Childbearing and on Infant Health Outcomes," Departmental Working Papers 2016-08, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:98:y:2008:i:2:p:403-07. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael P. Albert). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aeaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.