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Are Children Really Inferior Goods? Evidence from Displacement-Driven Income Shocks

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  • Jason M. Lindo

Abstract

This paper explores the causal link between income and fertility by analyzing women’s fertility response to the large and permanent income shock generated by a husband’s job displacement. I find that the shock reduces total fertility, suggesting that the causal effect of income on fertility is positive. A model that incorporates the time cost of children and assortative matching of spouses can simultaneously explain this result and the negative cross-sectional relationship. I also find that a husband’s displacement accelerates childbearing, which is consistent with lifecycle models of fertility in which the incentive to delay is driven by expected earnings growth.

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  • Jason M. Lindo, 2010. "Are Children Really Inferior Goods? Evidence from Displacement-Driven Income Shocks," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:45:y:2010:i2:p301-327
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