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Reaching High: Occupational Sorting and Higher Education Wage Inequality in the UK

  • Jan Kleibrink
  • Maren M. Michaelsen

    ()

We analyse wage differentials between Higher Education graduates in the UK, differentiating between polytechnic and university graduates. Polytechnic graduates earned on average lower wages than university graduates prior to the UK Further and Higher Education Act of 1992. The reform changed the system of Higher Education by giving all polytechnics university status. We show that wage differentials can be explained by a glass ceiling which prevented polytechnic graduates from reaching managerial and professional occupations. After the reform, they overtook graduates of traditional universities in terms of average wages.

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Paper provided by Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen in its series Ruhr Economic Papers with number 0377.

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Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rwi:repape:0377
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