IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/b/wbk/wbpubs/6802.html
   My bibliography  Save this book

Raising Student Learning in Latin America : The Challenge for the Twenty-First Century

Author

Listed:
  • Emiliana Vegas
  • Jenny Petrow

Abstract

Improving student learning is the key challenge for education in Latin America and the Caribbean. This book is divided into three parts. Part one focuses on the central role of student learning in education. Chapter one examines why student learning outcomes are important. Chapter two analyzes the extent to which learning takes place in schools in the region. Chapter three discusses some of the advantages and disadvantages of generating and using information on student learning to raise the quality of education. Part two reviews the evidence on the factors and policies that affect student learning. It first presents a conceptual framework that facilitates understanding of the factors that influence student learning. It then reviews the evidence on the impact on student learning of economic, political, and social conditions (chapter four); student endowments and behaviors (chapter five); school endowments and behaviors (chapter six); and institutional factors and policies (chapter seven). Part three focuses on quality assurance and beyond. Chapter eight examines evidence from countries that have succeeded in achieving high levels of learning among most, if not all, students, in order to present policy options on education quality assurance. Chapter nine summarizes the book's main messages and discusses unanswered questions.

Suggested Citation

  • Emiliana Vegas & Jenny Petrow, 2008. "Raising Student Learning in Latin America : The Challenge for the Twenty-First Century," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6802.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6802
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/6802/411730PAPER0LA101OFFICIAL0USE0ONLY1.pdf?sequence=1
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eric A. Hanushek & EJohn F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 2004. "Why Public Schools Lose Teachers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(2).
    2. West, Martin R. & Woessmann, Ludger, 2006. "Which school systems sort weaker students into smaller classes? International evidence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 944-968, December.
    3. Heneveld, W. & Craig, H., 1995. "School Count. World Bank Project Desings and Quality of Primary Education in Sub-Saharan Africa," Papers 303, World Bank - Technical Papers.
    4. Joseph G. Altonji & Charles R. Pierret, 2001. "Employer Learning and Statistical Discrimination," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(1), pages 313-350.
    5. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2006. "Inequality and Schooling Responses to Globalization Forces: Lessons from History," NBER Working Papers 12553, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2006. "Inequality and schooling responses to globalization forces: lessons from history," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, pages 225-248.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Nadir Altinok & Claude Diebolt & Jean-Luc Demeulemeester, 2014. "A new international database on education quality: 1965--2010," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(11), pages 1212-1247, April.
    2. Bando, Rosangela, 2015. "The effect of cash transfers to schools on voluntary contributions," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 224-236.
    3. Bourguignon, Francois & Rogers, F. Halsey, 2007. "Distributional effects of educational improvements: Are we using the wrong model?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 735-746, December.
    4. Paul Rodríguez-Lesmes & José D. Trujillo & Daniel Valderrama, 2015. "Are Public Libraries Improving Quality of Education? When the Provision of Public Goods is not Enough," REVISTA DESARROLLO Y SOCIEDAD, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE, December.
    5. Miguel Urquiola, 2015. "Progress and challenges in achieving an evidence-based education policy in Latin America and the Caribbean," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 24(1), pages 1-30, December.
    6. Rosangela Bando & Xia Li, 2014. "The Effect of In-Service Teacher Training on Student Learning of English as a Second Language," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6596, Inter-American Development Bank.
    7. Ortega, Daniel E., 2010. "The effect of wage compression and alternative labor market opportunities on teacher quality in Venezuela," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 760-771, October.
    8. Rosangela Bando & Xia Li, 2014. "The Effect of In-Service Teacher Training on Student Learning of English as a Second Language," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 86173, Inter-American Development Bank.
    9. Harinder Kohli & Claudio Loser & Anil Sood (ed.), 2013. "Latin America 2040 — Breaking Away from Complacency: An Agenda for Resurgence — Second Edition," Books, Emerging Markets Forum, edition 2, number latam2040v2, August.
    10. Daniel Ortega, 2010. "Human Development of Peoples," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 229-257.
    11. Meherun Ahmed & Kazi Iqbal, 2016. "Is There any Threshold in the Relationship Between Mother's Education and Child Health? Evidence from Nigeria," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 54(3), pages 243-256, September.
    12. Paul Rodríguez Lesmes & José Trujillo & Daniel Valderrama, 2013. "Más allá de la infraestructura: el impacto de las bibliotecas públicas en la calidad de la educación," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO 010499, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6802. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Breineder). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.