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Citations of

Miguel Faria-e-Castro

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Miguel Faria-e-Castro, 2017. "Fiscal Multipliers and Financial Crises," 2017 Meeting Papers 300, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas & Thomas Philippon & Dimitri Vayanos, 2016. "The Analytics of the Greek Crisis," GreeSE – Hellenic Observatory Papers on Greece and Southeast Europe 100, Hellenic Observatory, LSE.
    2. Lorenzo Bretscher & Alex Hsu & Andrea Tamoni, 2017. "Level and Volatility Shocks to Fiscal Policy: Term Structure Implications," 2017 Meeting Papers 258, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Gourinchas, Pierre-Olivier & Philippon, Thomas & Vayanos, Dimitri, 2016. "The analytics of the Greek crisis: celebratory centenary issue," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67368, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

  2. Miguel Faria-e-Castro & Luis Fonseca & Matteo Crosignani, 2016. "The (Unintended?) Consequences of the Largest Liquidity Injection Ever," 2016 Meeting Papers 43, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Acharya, Viral V & Eisert, Tim & Eufinger, Christian & Hirsch, Christian, 2017. "Whatever it takes: The Real Effects of Unconventional Monetary Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 12005, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Acharya, Viral & Pierret, Diane & Steffen, Sascha, 2016. "Lender of last resort versus buyer of last resort: The impact of the European Central Bank actions on the bank-sovereign nexus," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-019, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Carlo Altavilla & Marco Pagano & Saverio Simonelli, 2015. "Bank Exposures and Sovereign Stress Transmission," CSEF Working Papers 410, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 13 Jul 2017.
    4. Anil Ari, 2016. "Sovereign Risk and Bank Risk-Taking," 2016 Meeting Papers 676, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Beck, Thorsten & Da-Rocha-Lopes, Samuel & Silva, Andre, 2017. "Sharing the Pain? Credit Supply and Real Effects of Bank Bail-ins," CEPR Discussion Papers 12058, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Schneider, Michael & Lillo, Fabrizio & Pelizzon, Loriana, 2016. "How has sovereign bond market liquidity changed? An illiquidity spillover analysis," SAFE Working Paper Series 151, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    7. Corradin, Stefano & Heider, Florian & Hoerova, Marie, 2017. "On collateral: implications for financial stability and monetary policy," Working Paper Series 2107, European Central Bank.
    8. Nuno Alves & Diana Bonfim & Carla Soares, 2016. "Surviving the perfect storm: the role of the lender of last resort," Working Papers w201617, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    9. José-Luis Peydró & Andrea Polo & Sette Enrico, 2017. "Monetary policy at work: Security and credit application registers evidence," Economics Working Papers 1565, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    10. Bergant, Katharina, 2017. "Quantitative Easing and Portfolio Rebalancing: Micro Evidence from Irish Resident Banks," Economic Letters 07/EL/17, Central Bank of Ireland.

  3. Miguel Faria-e-Castro & Joseba Martinez & Thomas Philippon, 2015. "Runs versus Lemons: Information Disclosure and Fiscal Capacity," NBER Working Papers 21201, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. B. Camara & P. Pessarossi & T. Philippon, 2017. "Back-testing European stress tests," Débats économiques et financiers 26, Banque de France.
    2. Gadi Barlevy & Fernando Alvarez, 2014. "Mandatory Disclosure and Financial Contagion," 2014 Meeting Papers 115, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Goldstein, Itay & Leitner, Yaron, 2015. "Stress tests and information disclosure," Working Papers 15-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 16 Nov 2015.
    4. Kowalik, Michal, 2016. "Opacity and Disclosure in Short-Term Wholesale Funding Markets," Risk and Policy Analysis Unit Working Paper RPA 16-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    5. Vincent Maurin, 2016. "Liquidity Fluctuations in Over the Counter Markets," 2016 Meeting Papers 218, Society for Economic Dynamics.

  4. Luís Fonseca & Matteo Crosignani & Miguel Faria-e-Castro, 2015. "Central Bank Interventions, Demand for Collateral, and Sovereign Borrowing Costs," Working Papers w201509, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Ricardo Reis, 2015. "Looking for a Success in the Euro Crisis Adjustment Programs: The Case of Portugal," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 46(2 (Fall)), pages 433-458.
    2. Arnold, Ivo J.M. & Soederhuizen, Beau, 2018. "Bank stability and refinancing operations during the crisis: Which way causality?," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 79-89.
    3. van der Kwaak, Christiaan, 2017. "Financial Fragility and Unconventional Central Bank Lending Operations," Research Report 17005-EEF, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
    4. Arvind Krishnamurthy & Stefan Nagel & Annette Vissing-Jorgensen, 2017. "ECB Policies Involving Government Bond Purchases: Impact and Channels," NBER Working Papers 23985, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Reis, Ricardo, 2015. "Looking for a success in the euro crisis adjustment programs: the case of Portugal," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86274, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

Articles

  1. Miguel Faria-e-Castro & Joseba Martinez & Thomas Philippon, 2017. "Runs versus Lemons: Information Disclosure and Fiscal Capacity," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(4), pages 1683-1707.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Matteo Crosignani & Miguel Faria-e-Castro & Luís Fonseca, 2015. "The Portuguese Banking System during the Sovereign Debt Crisis," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Crosignani, Matteo & Faria-e-Castro, Miguel & Fonseca, Luis, 2017. "The (Unintended?) Consequences of the Largest Liquidity Injection Ever," Working Papers 2017-39, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    2. Luís Fonseca & Matteo Crosignani & Miguel Faria-e-Castro, 2015. "Central Bank Interventions, Demand for Collateral, and Sovereign Borrowing Costs," Working Papers w201509, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    3. Diana Bonfim & Gil Nogueira & Steven Ongena, 2016. "Sorry, We're Closed: Loan Conditions When Bank Branches Close and Firms Transfer to Another Bank," Working Papers w201607, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.

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