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Credit and Liquidity Policies during Large Crises

Author

Listed:
  • Mahdi Ebsim
  • Miguel Faria-e-Castro
  • Julian Kozlowski

Abstract

We compare firms’ financials during the Great Financial Crisis (GFC) and COVID-19. While the two crises featured similar increases in credit spreads, debt and liquid assets decreased during the GFC but increased during COVID-19. In the cross-section, leverage was the primary determinant of credit spreads and investment during the GFC, but liquidity was more important during COVID-19. We augment a quantitative model of firm capital structure with a motive to hold liquid assets. The GFC resembled a combination of productivity and financial shocks, while COVID-19 also featured liquidity shocks. We study the state-dependent effects of credit and liquidity policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Mahdi Ebsim & Miguel Faria-e-Castro & Julian Kozlowski, 2020. "Credit and Liquidity Policies during Large Crises," Working Papers 2020-035, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 29 Sep 2022.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:88871
    DOI: 10.20955/wp.2020.035
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Vasco M. Carvalho, 2014. "From Micro to Macro via Production Networks," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 28(4), pages 23-48, Fall.
    2. Julian Kozlowski, 2021. "Long-Term Finance and Investment with Frictional Asset Markets," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 411-448, October.
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    5. David Baqaee & Emmanuel Farhi, 2022. "Supply and Demand in Disaggregated Keynesian Economies with an Application to the COVID-19 Crisis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 112(5), pages 1397-1436, May.
    6. Nina Boyarchenko & Richard K. Crump & Anna Kovner & Or Shachar & Peter Van Tassel, 2020. "The Primary and Secondary Market Corporate Credit Facilities," Liberty Street Economics 20200526a, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    7. Boyarchenko, Nina & Kovner, Anna & Shachar, Or, 2022. "It’s what you say and what you buy: A holistic evaluation of the corporate credit facilities," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 144(3), pages 695-731.
    8. Mahyar Kargar & Benjamin Lester & David Lindsay & Shuo Liu & Pierre-Olivier Weill & Diego Zúñiga, 2021. "Corporate Bond Liquidity during the COVID-19 Crisis [The day coronavirus nearly broke the financial markets]," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 34(11), pages 5352-5401.
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    10. Simon Gilchrist & Bin Wei & Vivian Z. Yue & Egon Zakrajšek, 2020. "The Fed Takes on Corporate Credit Risk: An Analysis of the Efficacy of the SMCCF," NBER Working Papers 27809, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

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    2. Massimiliano Affinito & Raffaele Santioni, 2021. "When the panic broke out: COVID-19 and investment funds' portfolio rebalancing around the world," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1342, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Cesa-Bianchi, Ambrogio & Eguren-Martin, Fernando, 2021. "Dash for dollars," Bank of England working papers 932, Bank of England.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    credit spreads; liquidity; Great Recession; COVID-19;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • H0 - Public Economics - - General

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