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The Effect of Central Bank Liquidity Injections on Bank Credit Supply

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  • Luisa Carpinelli
  • Matteo Crosignani

Abstract

We study the effectiveness of central bank liquidity injections in restoring bank credit supply following a wholesale funding dry-up. We combine borrower-level data from the Italian credit registry with bank security-level holdings and analyze the transmission of the European Central Bank three-year Long Term Refinancing Operation. Exploiting a regulatory change that expands eligible collateral, we show that banks more affected by the dry-up use this facility to restore their credit supply, while less affected banks use it to increase their holdings of high-yield government bonds. Unable to switch from affected banks during the dry-up, firms benefit from the intervention.

Suggested Citation

  • Luisa Carpinelli & Matteo Crosignani, 2017. "The Effect of Central Bank Liquidity Injections on Bank Credit Supply," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-038, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2017-38
    DOI: 10.17016/FEDS.2017.038
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    File URL: https://www.federalreserve.gov/econres/feds/files/2017038pap.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gropp, Reint & Mosk, Thomas & Ongena, Steven & Wix, Carlo, 2016. "Bank response to higher capital requirements: Evidence from a quasi-natural experiment," SAFE Working Paper Series 156, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    2. Matteo Crosignani & Miguel Faria-e-Castro & Luís Fonseca, 2016. "The (unintended?) consequences of the largest liquidity injection ever," ESRB Working Paper Series 31, European Systemic Risk Board.
    3. Acharya, Viral V & Eisert, Tim & Eufinger, Christian & Hirsch, Christian, 2017. "Whatever it takes: The Real Effects of Unconventional Monetary Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 12005, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. repec:aic:revebs:y:2017:j:19:melnicf is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Krishnamurthy, Arvind & Nagel, Stefan & Vissing-Jorgensen, Annette, 2017. "ECB Policies Involving Government Bond Purchases: Impact and Channels," Research Papers repec:ecl:stabus:3578, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    6. C. Cahn & A. Duquerroy & W. Mullins, 2017. "Unconventional Monetary Policy and Bank Lending Relationships," Working papers 659, Banque de France.
    7. Corradin, Stefano & Heider, Florian & Hoerova, Marie, 2017. "On collateral: implications for financial stability and monetary policy," Working Paper Series 2107, European Central Bank.
    8. Francesco Bripi & David Loschiavo & Davide Revelli, 2017. "Services trade and credit frictions: evidence from matched bank-firm data," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1110, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    9. Carla Soares & Diana Bonfim & Nuno Alves, 2016. "Surviving the perfect storm: the role of the lender of last resort," Working Papers w201617, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    10. Anbil, Sriya & Vossmeyer, Angela, 2017. "Liquidity from Two Lending Facilities," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-117, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    11. José-Luis Peydró & Andrea Polo & Enrico Sette, 2017. "Monetary policy at work: Security and credit application registers evidence," Working Papers 964, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    12. Laura Blattner & Gil Nogueira & Luísa Farinha, 2016. "The Effect of Quantitative Easing on Lending Conditions," Working Papers w201608, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    13. Andreas Jobst & Anke Weber, 2016. "Profitability and Balance Sheet Repair of Italian Banks," IMF Working Papers 16/175, International Monetary Fund.
    14. Bergant, Katharina, 2017. "Quantitative Easing and Portfolio Rebalancing: Micro Evidence from Irish Resident Banks," Economic Letters 07/EL/17, Central Bank of Ireland.
    15. Machiel van Dijk & Andrei Dubovik, 2018. "Effects of Unconventional Monetary Policy on European Corporate Credit," CPB Discussion Paper 372, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bank Credit Supply ; Bank Wholesale Funding ; Lender of Last Resort ; Unconventional Monetary Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • H63 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - Debt; Debt Management; Sovereign Debt

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