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Monetary policy at work: Security and credit application registers evidence

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  • José-Luis Peydró
  • Andrea Polo
  • Enrico Sette

Abstract

Monetary policy transmission may be impaired if banks rebalance their portfolios towards securities to e.g. risk-shift or hoard liquidity. We identify the bank lending and risk-taking channels by exploiting – Italian’s unique – credit and security registers. In crisis times, with higher ECB liquidity, less capitalized banks react by increasing securities over credit supply, inducing worse firm-level real effects. However, they buy securities with lower yields and haircuts, thus reaching-for-safety and liquidity. Differently, in pre-crisis time, securities do not crowd-out credit supply. The substitution from lending to securities in crisis times helps less capitalized banks to repair their balance-sheets and then restart credit supply with a one year-lag.

Suggested Citation

  • José-Luis Peydró & Andrea Polo & Enrico Sette, 2017. "Monetary policy at work: Security and credit application registers evidence," Working Papers 964, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bge:wpaper:964
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    Cited by:

    1. Mark Mink & Rodney Ramcharan & Iman van Lelyveld, 2020. "How Banks Respond to Distress: Shifting Risks in Europe’s Banking Union," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 20-006/IV, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Massimiliano Affinito, 2019. "What do almost 20 years of micro data and two crises say about the relationship between central bank and interbank market liquidity? Evidence from Italy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1238, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Anne Kathrin Funk, 2019. "Quantitative easing in the euro area and SMEs' access to finance: Who benefits the most?," IHEID Working Papers 02-2019, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    4. Matteo Crosignani & Miguel Faria-e-Castro & Luís Fonseca, 2016. "The (unintended?) consequences of the largest liquidity injection ever," ESRB Working Paper Series 31, European Systemic Risk Board.
    5. Carlo Altavilla & Marco Pagano & Saverio Simonelli, 2017. "Bank Exposures and Sovereign Stress Transmission," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 21(6), pages 2103-2139.
    6. Anne Kathrin Funk, 2019. "Quantitative Lockerung in der Eurozone und Finanzierungs­bedingungen von KMU: Wer profitiert am meisten?," KOF Analysen, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich, vol. 13(1), pages 82-91, March.
    7. Margherita Bottero & Camelia Minoiu & José-Luis Peydró & Andrea Polo & Andrea F. Presbitero & Enrico Sette, 2019. "Expansionary Yet Different: Credit Supply and Real Effects of Negative Interest Rate Policy," Working Papers 1090, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    8. Mark Mink & Rodney Ramcharan & Iman van Lelyveld, 2020. "How banks respond to distress: Shifting risks in Europe's banking union," DNB Working Papers 669, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    9. Paludkiewicz, Karol, 2018. "Unconventional Monetary Policy, Bank Lending, and Security Holdings: The Yield-Induced Portfolio Rebalancing Channel," Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181669, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. repec:cpr:ceprdp:14233 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Grandi, Pietro, 2019. "Sovereign stress and heterogeneous monetary transmission to bank lending in the euro area," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 251-273.
    12. Johannes Bubeck & Angela Maddaloni & José-Luis Peydró, 2019. "Negative Monetary Policy Rates and Systemic Banks’ Risk-Taking: Evidence from the Euro Area Securities Register," Working Papers 1128, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    13. Pietro Grandi, 2018. "Sovereign risk and cross-country heterogeneity in the transmission of monetary policy to bank lending in the euro area," Working Papers hal-01878602, HAL.
    14. Gabriel Jiménez & José-Luis Peydró & Rafael Repullo & Jesús Saurina, 2017. "Burning Money? Government Lending in a Credit Crunch," Working Papers 984, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    15. Óscar Arce & Miguel García-Posada & Sergio Mayordomo & Steven Ongena, 2018. "Adapting lending policies when negative interest rates hit banks’ profits," Working Papers 1832, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    16. Matías Lamas & Javier Mencía, 2018. "What drives sovereign debt portfolios of banks in a crisis context?," Working Papers 1843, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    securities; credit supply; bank capital; monetary policy; reach-for-yield; haircuts; held to maturity; available for sale; trading book; Euro Area Sovereign Debt crisis;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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