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Money, Financial Stability and Efficiency

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  • Allen, Franklin
  • Carletti, Elena
  • Gale, Douglas M

Abstract

Most analyses of banking crises assume that banks use real contracts. However, in practice contracts are nominal and this is what is assumed here. We consider a standard banking model with aggregate return risk, aggregate liquidity risk and idiosyncratic liquidity shocks. We show that, with non-contingent nominal deposit contracts, the first-best efficient allocation can be achieved in a decentralized banking system. What is required is that the central bank accommodates the demands of the private sector for fiat money. Variations in the price level allow full sharing of aggregate risks. An interbank market allows the sharing of idiosyncratic liquidity risk. In contrast, idiosyncratic (bank-specific) return risks cannot be shared using monetary policy alone; real transfers are needed.

Suggested Citation

  • Allen, Franklin & Carletti, Elena & Gale, Douglas M, 2011. "Money, Financial Stability and Efficiency," CEPR Discussion Papers 8553, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8553
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    3. Altavilla, Carlo & Boucinha, Miguel & Peydró, José-Luis, 2018. "Monetary policy and bank profitability in a low interest rate environment," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 531-586.
    4. Jin Cao & Gerhard Illing, 2015. "Money in the Equilibrium of Banking," ISER Discussion Paper 0951, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
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    8. Simas Kucinskas, 2015. "Aggregate Risk and Efficiency of Mutual Funds," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-113/VI, Tinbergen Institute.
    9. Julia Körding & Beatrice Scheubel, 2018. "Liquidity regulation, the central bank and the money market," DNB Working Papers 596, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    10. Tarishi Matsuoka & Makoto Watanabe, 2017. "Banking Panics and Liquidity in a Monetary Economy," CESifo Working Paper Series 6722, CESifo.
    11. Peydró, José-Luis & Polo, Andrea & Sette, Enrico, 2021. "Monetary policy at work: Security and credit application registers evidence," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(3), pages 789-814.
    12. Allen, Franklin & Vayanos, Dimitri & Vives, Xavier, 2014. "Introduction to financial economics," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 1-14.
    13. Agur, Itai & Demertzis, Maria, 2019. "Will macroprudential policy counteract monetary policy’s effects on financial stability?," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 65-75.
    14. Matteo Barigozzi & Antonio M. Conti, 2018. "On the Stability of Euro Area Money Demand and Its Implications for Monetary Policy," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 80(4), pages 755-787, August.
    15. Werner, Richard A., 2014. "Can banks individually create money out of nothing? — The theories and the empirical evidence," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 1-19.
    16. Nyborg, Kjell G., 2017. "Reprint of: Central bank collateral frameworks," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 232-248.
    17. Matsuoka, Tarishi & Watanabe, Makoto, 2019. "Banking crises and liquidity in a monetary economy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 108(C).
    18. Gregory McKee & Albert Kagan, 2018. "Community bank structure an x-efficiency approach," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 19-41, July.
    19. Agur, Itai, 2019. "Monetary and macroprudential policy coordination among multiple equilibria," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 192-209.
    20. David Rivero & Hugo Rodríguez Mendizábal, 2021. "Banking and Inside Money: Revisiting the Efficiency of Deposit Contracts," Working Papers 1265, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    monetary policy; nominal contracts;

    JEL classification:

    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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